Courses

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Spring 2022 Film & Media Studies Courses

FILM 1051: Introduction to Film and Media Studies  
Instructor: Banerji, Ritwik                                                                                              (Online Asynchronous)                                                                                                                            This course offers a broad introduction to the study of film. We will consider such issues as: (1) how films are made and marketed, (2) how films tell stories, (3) the techniques of film art, (4) methods of film theory and criticism, and (5) important movements in film history. A major emphasis of the course will be learning how to analyze a film. You will be introduced to the vocabulary involved in film analysis and will practice analyzing film sequences, as well as discussing films as a whole. Examples for discussion will range widely, from different countries, time periods, and genres. The idea of this course is that film analysis can apply to all types of films, from self-conscious "arthouse" films to summer blockbusters. 

FILM 1052: Film & Media History                                                                                            Instructor: Niehoff, Petersen                                                                                                              (Tu/Th 9:30-10:50)                                                                                                                                    This class will trace the history of film and other screen media from the origins of motion pictures to the present. It will look at the most important technological, industrial, aesthetic, and cultural developments in screen media. Topics include the establishment of the film industry, the emergence of national cinemas, the studio system, key cinematic events and movements, and the emergence of new screen media technologies in the 20th and 21st centuries.  

FILM 1053: Global Film & Media                                                                                                  Instructor: Gott, Michael                                                                                                                        (Tu/Th 11:00-12:20)                                                                                                                                        This course introduces students to film and screen media with a global emphasis, from key movements and developments of the 20th century in global film to new media technologies and globalization. Students will discover and analyze various important international film and television trends and movements: Italian neo-realism, the French New Wave, Czech New Wave and stop action animation, the German New Wave, post-colonial African cinema, Nollywood, Asian cinemas, Latin American cinemas. It will also consider how cinema and screen media have, from the start, moved across borders in a variety of ways. The course uses a selection of films and clips to explore the specific economic, political and historical circumstances of cinema around the world. We close with a consideration of new technologies for making and disseminating films, from i-phones to YouTube and their role in representing important global events such as the refugee crisis. 

FILM 2008: Game Studies and New Media                                                                              Instructor: Torner, Evan                                                                                                                  (M/W/F 14:30-15:25)                                                                                                                                This course introduces students to key concepts regarding games and social networks as procedural and participatory media. The course begins with discussions of analog board games as well as early sports as practiced in the pre-colonial Americas, and concludes with modern game poems as well as recent developments in mobile apps and social media connectivity. Careful attention will be paid to the systems of emergent human interaction that the media under discussion produce, as well as their circulation within pre-modern and modern societies. The course also presents an array of theoretical and pragmatic approaches to game studies, including but not limited to: procedural rhetoric, simulationism/immersionism, narratology/ludology, political economy, cultural studies, queer(ing) gameplay, design ethics and transmedia. Prior experience with games or game studies is not required. 

FILM 2005 001: TOPICS (Media Law and Ethics)                                                                        Instructor: Penix, Len                                                                                                                                  (Tu/Th 15:30 - 16:50)                                                                                                                                      This course is designed to assist journalists and media practitioners in understanding the legal system and analyzing the elements of law that directly affect mediated communication.  The class discusses various topics through an introspective look at case law and current events.  Topics include First Amendment, libel, copyright, advertising, electronic and digital media, the courts and the media, obscenity and privacy.  Each topic will also include discussion of ethical concerns and exercises to stretch students' perception of their professional responsibilities.  We will also discuss several contemporary and historical/landmark cases, as well as hypothetical scenarios for informational and analytical purposes. 

FILM 2005 002: The Holocaust and Film                                                                                              Instructor: TBD                                                                                                                                              (Online Asynchronous)                                                                                                                                In Film and Holocaust, students view and analyze films portraying Jews during the Holocaust, from Nazi propaganda to postwar documentaries and artistic reconstruction. 

FILM 2005 003: Arab Cinema: Culture & Identity                                                                          Instructor: Thome, Grace                                                                                                                            (Tu/Th 11-12:20)                                                                                                                                            The course, taught in English, is an introduction to Arabic culture and identity through cinema. It focuses on Arabic films, with English subtitles, that highlight cultural movements from the early 20th century to the present time. The selected films, to be discussed and critically analyzed in class and writing assignments, cover a variety of themes such as the conflict between tradition and modernity, official, folk, and militant religious practices, rural and urban lifestyles, Islamic and Western values, colonial and native languages, religion and politics, sexuality and patriarchy; the impact of regional revolts, fundamentalism, sectarianism, globalization, immigration, history and memory, orientalism/anti-colonialism; and the construction of gender roles and individual and national identity. 

FILM 2015: Introduction to Screenwriting                                                                                              BoK: FA and HU                                                                                                                                              (Various meeting times)                                                                                                                              This course is an introduction to studying, learning, and practicing screenwriting techniques. Students will learn about film and television screenplay structure, analyze dramatic strategies in film and television, learn and apply correct script form, and creatively engage in the various stages of original scriptwriting. 

FILM 2053: Nazis in Cinema                                                                                                  Instructor: Nusser, Tanja                                                                                                                    (Tu/Th 11:00 - 12:20)                                                                                                                                This course, taught in English, will examine both films produced by and those focusing on the Nazi regime. What political, social, and cultural purposes did these films serve? How do they depict the era? What symbolic functions has the figure of the bad German' taken on in the decades since the fall of the Third Reich? From propaganda films such as Riefenstahl's Triumph of the Will to contemporary German reflections such as Hirschbiegel's The Downfall, from 3rd Reich entertainment fare such as Lucky Kids to depictions of Nazis as comic-book villains in Chaplin's The Great Dictator and Spielberg's Raiders of the Lost Ark, this course will examine the way in which the cinematic medium has served, dealt with, and undermined the Nazi regime. 

FILM 2083: Filmmaking in the Community                                                                      Instructor: O'Farrell, Frank                                                                                                                        (Th 16:00 - 18:50)                                                                                                                                        This class aimed at DMC and Film & Media Studies majors combines filmmaking theory and practice. Students will be working in part on a community film project in Price Hill. Students and local teens will collaborate to make a film about the neighborhood under the supervision of Frank O’Farrell, a writer and producer who runs the award-winning Fourthwall Youth Studios. You will make a film (as a group) that combines the theory that you learned in class with the input of community members to tell a cinematic story about the changing Price Hill and its past. 

FILM 2095: Film and Media Studies Internship                                                                    Instructor: Gott, Michael                                                                                                                            (No set meeting times)                                                                                                                            Students undertake experiential learning through intern positions in areas related to film and television production, cinema marketing, film festivals, and arts organizations with cinema programming. Internships introduce students to the career possibilities open to them upon graduation and provide valuable learning experiences to complement coursework. Internship experience helps students determine what aspect of film, television, and media field they would like to work in after graduation. Students may intern with local productions, in a number of Cincinnati institutions or businesses, or may seek out national and international internship opportunities.            *Please contact Michael.Gott@uc.edu if you wish to register 

FILM 3001: FILM MOVEMENTS -Topic "Contemporary Black Film"                                  Instructor: Jones, Cassandra                                                                                                          Mo 6:00 - 9:00                                                                                                                                              Although black directors, such as the prolific Oscar Micheaux, have made films from the earliest days of cinematic storytelling, the focus of this course is contemporary black film and  filmmakers. Drawing largely on films from the 1970s forward, this semester's theme examines expressions of blackness in horror film, the potential for more expansive representation of blackness, and black actors’ and filmmakers’ use of the genre’s flexibility to disrupt oppressive ideologies and confront cultural anxieties. Topics broached will be: possession and dispossession, sex, sexuality, and the horrors of family life, and technology, surveillance, and the limits of identity. 

FILM 3002 002 FILM THEORY - Topic: “Global Screen Networks and the Francophone World”    Instructor: Gott, Michael                                                                                                                            Tu/Th 2-3:20                                                                                                                                                    French television shows such Call my Agent (Dix pour cent) and Lupin have received a lot of attention and acclaim over the past couple years. French series and other media productions from all corners of the francophone world have enjoyed growing audiences due to the prevalence of global streaming platforms. In this class you will delve into the systems that create, produce, and circulate French, African, and French-Canadian series and films, from the Cannes Film Festival to Netflix and the Séries Mania Festival. We will consider what “sells” in France and abroad and models for producing shows and films that maintain French or other local characteristics but also travel well to reach global audiences. Primary sources include films and episodes of TV series from France, Quebec, Senegal and podcasts about French film and TV industries.  The class will be conducted in English on Tuesdays with separate French and English small group discussions on Thursdays. 

FILM 3002 001 FILM THEORY                                                                                                Instructor: Jennings, Nancy                                                                                                                      “Media Impact”                                                                                                                        (Online Asynchronous)                                                                                                                          This course is designed to provide students with an extended understanding of influence of mediated communication on the individual and society. The course gives students the opportunity to understand the nature and functions of media effects, become acquainted with current perspectives on media effects, apply this knowledge to a specific area of inquiry, and move forward with a viewpoint and the tools to navigate the world of mediated effects on their own.

FILM 5001 001 Capstone                                                                                                                          Instructor: Jennings, Nancy                                                                                                                      (Linked to 3002 001 - See description above)

FILM 5001 002 Capstone                                                                                                                              Instructor: Gott, Michael                                                                                                                      (Linked to 3002 002 - See description above)

FILM 3096: Race and Gender in Video Games                                                                        Instructor: Jones, Cassandra                                                                                                              (MWF 14:30-15:25)                                                                                                                                          This course explores the narratives of video games and the culture built around video games to understand how they both help to shape and are shaped by discourses of race, gender, and sexuality. In order to fully understand how the games operate as interactive storytelling devices in which the player co-creates meaning in the game’s narrative, students will play selected video games and their ephemera to produce narrative analyses of the games. 

Graduate Courses

FILM 7001 001 FILM SEMINAR - Empirical Communication Research Methods                          Instructor: Jennings, Nancy                                                                                                                        (M 6:00-8:50)                                                                                                                                                    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to methods of designing, conducting, and analyzing empirical communication research. The term empirical means "observable/and or measurable" in the real world. The course seeks to overview the predominant empirical approaches used in the Communication discipline to study and analyze communication phenonomena.

FILM 7005 001 FILM SEMINAR - Global Screen Networks & the Francophoen World                    Instructor: Michael Gott                                                                                                                      (Thu 14:00-15:20)                                                                                                                                             This course is a graduate version of FILM 3002 (description above). Students taking the course for graduate credit attend the undergrad lectures and discussions and occasionally meet with the professor and their fellow grad students. They may do a research paper, video essay, or teaching project that combine their interests with the theme of the class.   

French television shows such Call my Agent (Dix pour cent) and Lupin have received a lot of attention and acclaim over the past couple years. French series and other media productions from all corners of the francophone world have enjoyed growing audiences due to the prevalence of global streaming platforms. In this class you will delve into the systems that create, produce, and circulate French, African, and French-Canadian series and films, from the Cannes Film Festival to Netflix and the Séries Mania Festival. We will consider what “sells” in France and abroad and models for producing shows and films that maintain French or other local characteristics but also travel well to reach global audiences. Primary sources include films and episodes of TV series from France, Quebec, Senegal and podcasts about French film and TV industries.  The class will be conducted with all levels on Tuesday, with separate graduate small group discussions on Thursday. 

FILM 7005 001 FILM SEMINAR                                                                                                Instructor: Torner, Evan                                                                                                                      (MWF 14:30-15:25)                                                                                                                                          This course is a graduate version of Game Studies and New Media (FILM 2008). See the description above. Students taking the course for graduate credit attend the undergrad lectures and discussions and occasionally meet with the professor and their fellow grad students. They can undertake a research project of their choice.

FILM 7095: Film and Media Studies Internship                                                                      Instructor: Gott, Michael                                                                                                                            TBD                                                                                                                                                              Students undertake experiential learning through intern positions in areas related to film and television production, cinema marketing, film festivals, and arts organizations with cinema programming.                                                                                                                                                 *Please contact Michael.Gott@uc.edu if you wish to register