Fall 2022 Undergraduate History Courses

1000 & 2000 Courses

The Department offers a variety of 1000 and 2000 level surveys that expose students to fundamental overviews of US, European, Latin American, Middle Eastern, Russian, and Asian history in addition to World History. History majors are required to complete at least two survey courses, which do not need to be sequential. Thus, a History major could complete one semester of “World History” and one semester of “U.S. Women’s History” to fulfill this requirement. 

There is a general expectation that assignments in 1000- and 2000-level courses will involve analytical writing, including essay examinations or papers. Both 1000 and 2000-level courses are generally bigger than upper-division courses, so they are usually based on a lecture format, though all of them also include time for class discussion.

HIST 1001: United States History I

Painting of woman holding flag with hand resting on bust of George Washington

M/W 11:15AM - 12:10PM
Dr. Christopher Phillips
This course explores the settlement and expansion of the American colonies as a pluralistic society in which attempts at inclusion were challenged by distinct structures of inequity and hierarchy, the establishment and expansion of the United States during the first half of the nineteenth century and the social, economic and political divisions that lead to the outbreak of Civil War and continuing regional variations following 1865. This course explores contact among and the resulting experiences of North American Indigenous peoples, Europeans, Africans, Latino/as, and Asian/Pacific Americans and the complex societies and cultures and structures of power that developed from the period of contact through the expansion of North American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It examines broad themes of the colonial period, comparing historical ideas about social order, politics, economics, and labor with primary sources that show the varied experiences of people based on their race, sex, ethnicity, social and legal status, and religion. The course also explores the establishment of the United States after a Revolutionary period in which many different sorts of people struggled to realize popular conceptions of liberty for themselves. It further examines the United States' expansion during the first half of the nineteenth century, and the social, economic, and political controversies over race and slavery that ultimately led to the outbreak of the Civil War. Finally, the course addresses continuing regional variations following 1865, and how policies of Reconstruction hardened social and legal inequalities, including Jim Crow segregations, that continue to shape American conversations about identity, inclusion, and the equal protection of the law.
BoKs:
Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 1002: United States History II

Painting of people riding the subway

Online - Asynchronous 
Prof. Anthony Russomanno
This course surveys United States history from the end of Reconstruction through the late 20th century. Emphasizing the centrality of diverse peoples, identities, and experiences in this history, the course examines social, cultural, and political movements and related developments, introducing students to the major forces which have shaped American life since the late nineteenth century. Emphasizing the different types of access that distinct groups have had to structures of power and rights, the course explores issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, national origin, and class through such lenses as economics and labor, migration and immigration, protest movements and rights-based politics, foreign relations and war, and cultural life. While the course will take historical moments on their own terms, it will also invite students to consider how the past continues to inform our present.
BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 1003: World History I

Two cupped palms with world map painted on them

T/Th 12:30PM - 1:50PM
Dr. Sigrun Haude

This course investigates the origins, development, and interactions of world cultures from ancient times to roughly 1500 AD. Key topics considered in the course include the emergence of the world's first large-scale urban civilizations, the rise of classical empires, the emergence and spread of the world's religions, and the gradual consolidation and interaction among major world culture areas in Europe, East Asia, South Asia, Central Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and the Americas. This course will discuss the origins of major systems of power from the earliest civilizations on, such as patriarchy, social class, and slavery. It will discuss how, through connection with governments, religious systems became associated with specific cultures and specific rights (or lack thereof) in different areas. It will discuss how the rise of empire created ongoing legal frameworks to deal with the treatment of heterogenous populations, including but not limited to questions of privilege based on ethnicity, gender, and religion. Through the reading of primary sources as well as historical scholarship, students will engage with multiple perspectives and articulate how they reflect their contemporary social structures. Throughout our consideration of these key themes, this course will pay attention to the structures of power that created and sustained systems of inequality in world societies then and today.
BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility 

HIST 1004: World History II

Person standing on a colorful map

Online - Asynchronous 
Prof. Katherine Ranum
This course is an introductory survey of world history from approximately 1450 to the present. In this roughly five hundred year period, the world has been affected by stunning changes, and we’ll be exploring them all: the emergence, diversification, and transformation of global capitalism as a political-economic system with social implications, the rise and fall of Western colonial expansion on a world scale with the creations of internal colonial hierarchies of power based on race, religion, and national origin, the rise and fall of Atlantic slavery that enabled the Western growth in power, the industrial revolution, profound changes in the distribution and size of the world’s population, the emergence of nationalism and socialism, the eruption in the twentieth century of the most global and most devastating wars the world has ever known, and gradual evolution and transformation of an interconnected global economy. From 1500 on, this course will discuss evolving ideas of human rights around the world, including attitudes toward slavery, social class, gender, religion, nationality, and race. Through the reading of primary sources as well as historical scholarship, students will engage with multiple perspectives and articulate how they reflect their contemporary social structures. Throughout this class, we will be examining developments of immense importance for understanding our contemporary world, and one of the key challenges we’ll take up is trying to make sense of these issues from diverse points of view, while also considering their evolving significance and implications.
BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 1007: Middle Eastern History I

historical image of Muhammad

T/Th 11:00AM - 12:20PM
Dr. Robert Haug
This course will explore the history of the Middle East (Southwest Asia) and North Africa (as well as some of their neighbors) from Late Antiquity to the early modern era. We will go from the Byzantine and Sasanian Empires, the rise of Islam and the caliphate to the foundation of the so-called “gun powder empires.” Along the way, we will study the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the area, including arts, architecture, law, literature, and folk cultures.

BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC), Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion (DEI), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility 

HIST 1011: Greek History 

T/Th 2:00PM - 3:20PM
Dr. Danielle Kellogg

Survey of Greek history from the Bronze Age to theRoman conquest. The course will focus on the political, social, and economic history of Greece and the Greek settlements around the Mediterranean, from the rise of Sparta in the archaic period and of Athens in the classical period to the extraordinary exploits of Alexander the Great that took the Greeks as far east as India in the Hellenistic period.
BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC), Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion (DEI), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Critical Thinking & Knowledge Integration

HIST 1027: History of Jewish Civilization I: Origins to 1500

T/Th 9:30AM - 10:50AM
Dr. Aryay Finkelstein

Jewish civilization in the context of world history and culture as interpreted through Jewish historical, religious, literary, and cultural developments, Biblical through medieval period (to1500).
BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC), Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion (DEI), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration

HIST 1089: Human Rights & Security: Seeking Balance in a Free Society 

statue of liberty holding a sword

Tu 12:30AM - 1:50PM
Dr. Rebecca Sanders, Dr. Stephen Porter 
Are human rights and security contradictory or complementary? Must we sacrifice certain freedoms for the sake of national or personal security? This course tackles these problems through the lenses of history and political science, enabling students to learn how knowledge of the past is essential for shaping our present and future. Focusing primarily on the domestic and international politics and policies of the United States, the course explores a number of case studies related to immigration and refugee affairs, wartime internment and detention, counterterrorism and intelligence practices, international intervention and alliances, and economic and social policy.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Social & Ethical Issues (SE)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility, Information Literacy

HIST 2010: History of China

a statue of ancient Chinese soldier

M/W/F 11:15AM - 12:10PM
Dr. Man Bun Kwan
This course is an introductory survey of Chinese history from the Paleolithic Age to the present focusing on its long term cultural, social, institutional, and technological evolution.
BoKs: Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI), Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 2020: Coming of Civil War

images of President Lincoln on the left, map of the nation on the right. On the bottom, the historical flyer mentioning anti-slavery mass meeting

M/W (in-person) 1:25PM - 2:20PM
F (online) 1:25PM -2:25PM
Dr. Christopher Phillips 

This course takes an in-depth look at the national events and controversies that led to the American Civil War, the most tumultuous era and momentous event in our history.  More broadly, we’ll be studying the antebellum period, one of rapid American development: slavery and the complicated history of American race relations, national and state politics, social and class relations, industrialism, the growth of the West, the rise of the antislavery and proslavery movements, the Mexican War and the territorial conflicts, as well as important military and political events, such sectionalism and secession, that preceded the Civil War. We will study a number of important historical figures who figured deeply into the period’s fiery trial, such as Abraham Lincoln, John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, Frederick Douglass, Dred Scott, John Brown, and their evolving ideas of American liberty. By this important era, successive generations of Americans (and non-Americans) have come to understand our nation and ourselves.   
BoKs: Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI), Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility, Information Literacy

HIST 2022: Native American History

Artistic representation of American Gothic but with a Native American couple

T/Th 9:30AM - 10:50AM
Dr. Rebecca Wingo
This class provides students an opportunity to study the history of Native Americans, the interactions between indigenous peoples and their interactions with the larger American culture and society. The course will examine the historical, political, social, and economic relations between Native Americans, the federal government, and American society in general. An understanding of these exchanges will assist students to comprehend the modern state of affairs between indigenous nations and the United States generally
BoKs: Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI), Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Critical Thinking, Social Responsibility

HIST 2023: Environmental Activism 

Group of people protesting with signs and yelling

M/W/F 10:10AM - 11:05AM
Dr. David Stradling
This mixed lecture and discussion course examines the development of American environmentalism in the twentieth century. Our investigation will include the analysis of various efforts to shape government policies, from the conservation movement through the environmental justice movement and the sustainability movement. The focus on politics and activism allows a greater understanding of how Americans have altered their environment and provides case studies for examination of the American political system. The primary goal of the course is to explore the complexity of modern environmentalism and its diverse sources and multiple consequences. Students will participate in and assess a local environmental interest group.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Society, Culture, and Ethics (SCE) & Social & Ethical Issues (SE)
BCs:
Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration & Social Responsibility

HIST 2026: Cities in American History

Picture of buildings in a city

M/W/F 1:25PM - 2:20PM
Dr. David Stradling

This mixed lecture and discussion course will examine the growth and eventual decline of American cities, with a particular emphasis on the development of an urban culture through the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. The course will investigate the influence of democracy, capitalism, and industrialism in shaping urban America. Paying particularly close attention to urban geography, we will study the roles of gender, class, and race in shaping the urban landscape. The class will analyze the way the city itself has influenced events. This course will also emphasize the many problems that urbanity has caused for a political economy developed to serve an agrarian society. The latter half of the course will focus on suburbanization and the developing urban crisis of the late twentieth century.
BoKs: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Historical Perspectives (HP) & Social & Ethical Issues (SE)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking,Information Literacy,Knowledge Integration & Social Responsibility

HIST 2051: American Military History

Painting of George Washington crossing the Delaware in a boat with other soldiers

T/Th 8:00AM - 9:20AM
Dr. James Streckfuss

Notes: This is a combined section class.
The course will analyze the military's role in society by examining the evolution of war and the development of a professional military.  A strategic view of all U.S. Army engagements from the American Revolution through the current War on Terror will be developed through the lens of the application or neglect of the nine principles of warfare: mass, objective, offensive, surprise, economy of force, maneuver, unity of command, security and simplicity.  The course will explore the evolving influences of technology, engineering, and science development on military strategy and tactics.  The latter part of the course will include discussion of the increasing frequency of U.S. military in multinational, joint operations as well as the role of the American military in humanitarian missions and the transition of the American soldier from war fighter to nation builder.  Finally, the course will analyze lessons learned from current American operating environments in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as the U.S. military's role in the War on Terror.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Technology & Innovation (TI)
BCs: Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Information Literacy, Knowledge Integration

HIST 2060: African History I: Human Origin, African Civilizations and the Rise of the Trans-Atlantic Slave

Online - T/Th 11:00AM - 12:20PM
Dr. Lotsmart Fonjong

This course explores the various political, socialand economic developments in pre-colonial Africa and the continent's relationship with other parts of the world, including Asia, Europe and the Middle East. We will also discuss the rise of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its impacts on the continent.
BoKs: Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI), Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 2069: History of Showbiz: The American Experience from Vaudeville to Broadway

T/Th 11:00AM - 12:20PM
Dr. Mark Raider

This course offers a thematic and inquiry-based approach to the history of American show business, referred to colloquially as "showbiz." While introducing students to historiographic practices, the course investigates a variety of theatre productions including minstrel shows, operas, operettas, and Broadway musicals from the nineteenth century to the present day. It pays close attention to the social, cultural, and historical context of these productions as well as the composers, lyricists, producers, directors, choreographers, and performing artists who contributed to their development. The course utilizes interdisciplinary materials in order to underscore multiple intellectual and methodological approaches to the subject. The main themes and issues of the class are covered through a series of lectures and/or presentations, reading, writing, and film viewing assignments, and discussions and activities.
BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility, Information Literacy

Freshman Seminars

Our Freshman Seminars (HIST 1099 online) are designed as interactive, small-enrollment classes in which first-year students work with leading historians on the in-depth study of a range of historical issues.  Seminars in the past have focused on topics such as: The Essential Documents of the American Revolution; City Life in Renaissance Italy; The Merchant of Venice in Historical Perspective; and World War I in Memoir, Fiction, and Film. The goal of these classes is to expose students to the special rewards of studying history at the college-level by allowing them to focus on a topic up-close with leading experts in the field.  These courses also fulfill the departmental requirement for majors and minors concerning lower level electives.

HIST 1099-001: The Press in American History

T/Th 9:30AM - 10:50AM
Prof. Kevin McPartland

This course covers the history and impact of mass media and the press in American history. From revolutionary pamphlets to muckrakers to the Civil Rights movement, the press has played a central role in both reporting the news and influencing what people think about it. This course delves into the social, legal, and cultural story of the press, examining how it has both changed with and shaped the course of US history from the Revolution to the present day.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration

HIST 1099-002: Hidden Figures in Civil Rights

Claudette Colvin

Claudette Colvin was the first African American women to refuse to move to the back of a bus nine months before Rosa Parks did, but the NAACP did not want to use her to represent their organization because she was fifteen years old and pregnant.

M/W/F 1:25PM - 2:20PM
Prof. Nicholas Brown

Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela, Jesse Jackson, John Lewis. There is a good chance you know at least one of these people. But do you know names such as A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, Jo Ann Robinson, Milton Webster, Whitney Young Jr., E.D. Nixon, etc. These people as is the case with so many others, are forgotten in the freedom struggle (Civil Rights Movement). This class will explore (and debate) why certain narratives and people are mostly forgotten in our current social memory and analyze what these people did in the Civil Rights Movement. The course will cover the modern Civil Rights Movement (circa 1920-1970).
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration

HIST 3000: Thought & Methods

This small seminar is required of all History majors and minors as an essential introduction to the ideas and practices of studying history and conducting historical research.  With this goal in mind, students read a selection of books and articles touching on different periods, world regions, and historiographical approaches that expose the many ways historians do their work.  

Compass sitting on a map in antiquated sepia tones

HIST3000-001
T/Th 2:00PM -3:20PM
Dr. Robert Haug

HIST3000-002
M/W 2:30PM - 3:50PM
Dr. Jeffrey Zalar

BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

Upper-Division Courses

Courses at the 3001 to 4099 level are designed to give students an in-depth knowledge of the history of a particular place or era, such as medieval or early modern Europe, or of a historical subject that cuts across geographical and chronological boundaries, such as the history of slavery and emancipation, or of a special research methodology used by historians, such as computer applications in history, the analysis of material culture, or the study of intellectual discourse. These courses vary in format and may include lectures, discussions, readings from secondary materials, and use of primary materials such as documents, films, or still pictures. 

In addition, 4000-level courses also include a guided research component that introduces students to the basic methods of research in order to prepare them for the research projects ahead in the History 5000 research seminars.

HIST 3006: West African History and Civilizations

Online – Asynchronous
Dr. Joseph Takougang

This course discusses the various forces that helped in shaping the history and life experiences of the peoples of pre-colonial West Africa. Special attention will be paid to the rise and fall of such great empires as Ghana, Mali and Songhay, and the importance of both the trans-Saharan trade and the trans-Atlantic slave trade in shaping that history.
BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC) & Society, Culture, and Ethics (SCE)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 3017: Slavery in America

picture of slavery in America

T/Th 12:30PM - 1:50PM
Dr. Wayne Durrill

This course will examine the origins and development of race based chattel slavery in British North America and the United States, the impact of the institution on Africans and African Americans, the rise of the abolitionist movement, the political consequences of slavery, and its eventual demise in the United States and the western hemisphere. All major aspects of the institution of slavery will be surveyed, such as the slave trade, the legalization of the institution, and slave adaptation and rebellion.
BoKs: Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI), Diversity & Culture (DC), Historical Perspectives (HP)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Social Responsibility

HIST 3038: The Soviet Union in World War II

T/Th 9:30AM - 10:50AM
Dr. Willard Sunderland

This course will examine the Soviet experience in World War II, paying close attention to the political, military, social, cultural, and economic dimensions of the conflict and its complicated impact on Soviet state and society. The class will also explore the way the war has been remembered and interpreted in the post-war era, including in the contemporary states of the former USSR such as the Russian Federation, the Baltic countries, and Ukraine.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP) & Society, Culture, and Ethics (SCE)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Information Literacy

HIST 3048: Race and Science in the United States

people crowded behind the glass window

M/W/F 11:15AM - 12:10PM
Dr. Tracy Teslow

This course examines the way scientific concepts and practices have defined racial difference in the United States. Spanning the 19th and 20th centuries, the course seeks to better understand the multiple, shifting meanings and uses of race and the participation of the biological, medical and social sciences in constructing them. The course asks how race has been defined, by whom, and to what end. In looking for answers to these questions, our study will include Chinese-American residents of San Francisco and the politics of public health practices, eugenics and the construction of whiteness, IQ debates, UNESCO statements on race, and the Human Genome Diversity Project.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Diversity & Culture (DC), Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 3076: Imperial China

Tapestry art of the Buddha, with other figures and patterns

M/W/F 9:05AM - 10:00AM
Dr. Man Bun Kwan

This course focuses on the history of China from neolithic times down to the 12th century. How did the country develop to become one of the world's oldest continuous civilizations, while surviving invasions and disasters (natural or otherwise)? Topics include major institutions such as the imperial system, Confucianism, Buddhism, civil service examination, and other Chinese gifts to humankind (including bureaucracy).
BCs: Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Information Literacy, Knowledge Integration
 

HIST 3078: World War I and the World

soldiers gathering and taking a pictures

Online - T/Th 2:00PM - 3:20PM
Dr. Elizabeth Frierson

This class will focus on the history of World War I and the world, in particular, Europe and its colonial empires as well as the United States and those parts of Asia and the Near East that would be importantly affected by both the War and the settlements that followed in its wake. This history will include an analysis of the causes of the War as well the ramifications and consequences of the Versailles Treaty. Students will read a variety of important and revealing primary materials from government reports, diplomatic and military accounts, newspaper articles, propaganda,to memoirs, poetry and novels; several films will also be introduced. We shall examine the war itself on both the western and eastern fronts, examine soldiers' experiences and military strategies, nurses' experiences as well as historiographical debates among scholars regarding the ways in which the War ushered in new interpretations and understandings of modernity. In addition, we shall investigate the war's relationship to the home front, the societal and cultural changes ushered in by the war, and the revolutions unleashed by this war in places as different as Ireland and the Russian empire.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Diversity & Culture (DC), Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 3079: Stock Exchanges and Global Capitalism

sign of London stack market

T/Th 11:00AM - 12:20PM
Dr. Maura O'Connor

This course examines the historical, cultural, andeconomic histories of the rise and expansion of financial and global capitalism through the lens of the stock exchange as a world institution, fromthe seventeenth century to the present. The courseexplores the relationships between the stock exchange and early forms of mercantile and commercial capitalism as well as the slave trade and colonialism; the rise of technologies that helped to erase space and time like the railroad, telegraph, telephone, and then computer; and the stock exchange's relationships to industrialization and democracy.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Diversity & Culture (DC), Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 3155: Nazi Medicine

Drawing if a man and woman and tree kids

Online – Asynchronous
Dr. Katherine Sorrels
This course investigates the rise of the Nazi Party, the National Socialist seizure of power, and the policies of the Nazi state before and during the Second World War, with a particular focus on Nazi medicine and scientific racism. Topics include euthanasia and sterilization as public health measures; concentration camps as sites of medical research; and the views of Nazi doctors on race, genetics, gender, sexual orientation, and disability. The course concludes with a discussion of the implications of Nazi medicine for contemporary policy and debate on the scientific study of race, the doctor-patient relationship, and the issue of informed consent in medicine.
BoKs:  Historical Perspectives (HP), Society, Culture, & Ethics (SCE), Social & Ethical Issues (SE) 
BCs: Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Knowlege Integration, Social Welfare 

HIST 3192: Aztec, Inka, and Maya: Indigenous Empires in Latin America

M/W 1:25PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00AM -12:00AM
Dr. Brianna Leavitt- Alcantara

We tend to imagine the Mexica (“Aztec”), Inkan, and Mayan empires as timeless ancient dynasties reigning for centuries over large areas of Latin America until they were conquered and wiped out by the Spanish, or in the case of the Maya, until their “mysterious” decline and collapse. This course moves beyond such mythical images to explore the dynamic and complex expansion of these three indigenous Latin American empires and how they creatively built upon and adapted earlier imperial models in Mesoamerica and the Andes. We will explore how and why the Mexican, Inkan, and Mayan empires employed diverse methods of conquest and colonization, how religion, culture, politics, and economics shaped imperial ideologies, societies, and systems of rule, and how imperial tensions and rivalries led powerful native kingdoms to ally with the Spanish. We will also consider how these imperial histories continued into the colonial period and beyond, how Spanish colonialism built directly upon the Mexica and Inca imperial systems and infrastructure, and how native peoples in the former Mexican, Inkan, and Mayan empires responded to and survived Spanish colonialism, significantly shaping colonial and modern Latin American societies. 
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Diversity & Culture (DC), & Society, Culture, and Ethics (SCE)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 3196: War and Society in the Age of Napoleon, 1796-1815

historical image of Napoleon's battle

M/W/F 10:10AM - 11:05AM
Dr. Jeffrey Zalar

This lecture and discussion course addresses the Napoleonic age in Europe from Napoleon’s First Italian Campaign in 1796 to the Congress of Vienna in 1815, which brought the Napoleonic era to a close.  It emphasizes the comprehensive impact of warfare not only on the battlefield, but also on the intellectual, cultural, and political histories of belligerent states, above all France, Austria, Imperial Russia, and the affected polities of Central, Southern, and Iberian Europe.  It attends to everyday life during this period, to the experience of women and children, and to the sufferings of millions of noncombatants.  It addresses, finally, diplomatic developments that portended the restoration of European order after 1815.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP) & Society, Culture, and Ethics (SCE)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration

HIST 4002: From Natural Law to Human Rights?

people making a shape of scale on the ground

M/W 2:30PM - 3:50PM
Dr. Susan Longfield Karr

Although Human Rights issues continue to be debated and contested, the longer history and intellectual tradition of Human Rights is often unexamined and even forgotten. Our contemporary understanding of the content and force of rights globally through international law as well as humanitarian actions has grown out of earlier roots in the Natural Law and Natural Rights traditions in the West. In this course, we will trace the changes and continuities of debates and claims about rights throughout the late-medieval and early modern periods in order to explore how rights are historically asserted, justified, and defended before turning to the transformation of rights--from natural to human--in relation to the American and French Revolutions. At the end of this course students will have acquired an understanding of and critical perspective on the history of rights traditions that inform the Human Rights documents and regimes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 4025: War on the U.S. Home Front

T/Th 2:00PM - 3:20PM
Dr. Mark Raider

This course explores how America's involvement in wars during the 20th and early 21st centuries has profoundly transformed society, politics, law, and culture on the American home front. Topics include changes in such home-front issues as race, gender, and class relations; citizenship; rights; labor; welfare; government-economic relations; youth culture; family; and political conformity and dissent.
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Information Literacy

Upper-Division Courses listed by Requirements

HIST 3006: West African History and Civilizations

Online – Asynchronous
Dr. Joseph Takougang

This course discusses the various forces that helped in shaping the history and life experiences of the peoples of pre-colonial West Africa. Special attention will be paid to the rise and fall of such great empires as Ghana, Mali and Songhay, and the importance of both the trans-Saharan trade and the trans-Atlantic slave trade in shaping that history.
BoKs: Diversity & Culture (DC) & Society, Culture, and Ethics (SCE)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 3076: Imperial China

Tapestry art of the Buddha, with other figures and patterns

M/W/F 9:05AM - 10:00AM
Dr. Man Bun Kwan

This course focuses on the history of China from neolithic times down to the 12th century. How did the country develop to become one of the world's oldest continuous civilizations, while surviving invasions and disasters (natural or otherwise)? Topics include major institutions such as the imperial system, Confucianism, Buddhism, civil service examination, and other Chinese gifts to humankind (including bureaucracy).
BCs: Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Information Literacy, Knowledge Integration
 

HIST 3078: World War I and the World

soldiers gathering and taking a pictures

Online - T/Th 2:00PM - 3:20PM
Dr. Elizabeth Frierson

This class will focus on the history of World War I and the world, in particular, Europe and its colonial empires as well as the United States and those parts of Asia and the Near East that would be importantly affected by both the War and the settlements that followed in its wake. This history will include an analysis of the causes of the War as well the ramifications and consequences of the Versailles Treaty. Students will read a variety of important and revealing primary materials from government reports, diplomatic and military accounts, newspaper articles, propaganda,to memoirs, poetry and novels; several films will also be introduced. We shall examine the war itself on both the western and eastern fronts, examine soldiers' experiences and military strategies, nurses' experiences as well as historiographical debates among scholars regarding the ways in which the War ushered in new interpretations and understandings of modernity. In addition, we shall investigate the war's relationship to the home front, the societal and cultural changes ushered in by the war, and the revolutions unleashed by this war in places as different as Ireland and the Russian empire.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Diversity & Culture (DC), Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 3079: Stock Exchanges and Global Capitalism

sign of London stack market

T/Th 11:00AM - 12:20PM
Dr. Maura O'Connor

This course examines the historical, cultural, andeconomic histories of the rise and expansion of financial and global capitalism through the lens of the stock exchange as a world institution, fromthe seventeenth century to the present. The courseexplores the relationships between the stock exchange and early forms of mercantile and commercial capitalism as well as the slave trade and colonialism; the rise of technologies that helped to erase space and time like the railroad, telegraph, telephone, and then computer; and the stock exchange's relationships to industrialization and democracy.
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Diversity & Culture (DC), Diversity, Equity, & Incusion (DEI)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 3192: Aztec, Inka, and Maya: Indigenous Empires in Latin America

M/W 1:25PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00AM -12:00AM
Dr. Brianna Leavitt- Alcantara

We tend to imagine the Mexica (“Aztec”), Inkan, and Mayan empires as timeless ancient dynasties reigning for centuries over large areas of Latin America until they were conquered and wiped out by the Spanish, or in the case of the Maya, until their “mysterious” decline and collapse. This course moves beyond such mythical images to explore the dynamic and complex expansion of these three indigenous Latin American empires and how they creatively built upon and adapted earlier imperial models in Mesoamerica and the Andes. We will explore how and why the Mexican, Inkan, and Mayan empires employed diverse methods of conquest and colonization, how religion, culture, politics, and economics shaped imperial ideologies, societies, and systems of rule, and how imperial tensions and rivalries led powerful native kingdoms to ally with the Spanish. We will also consider how these imperial histories continued into the colonial period and beyond, how Spanish colonialism built directly upon the Mexica and Inca imperial systems and infrastructure, and how native peoples in the former Mexican, Inkan, and Mayan empires responded to and survived Spanish colonialism, significantly shaping colonial and modern Latin American societies. 
BoKs: Historical Perspectives (HP), Diversity & Culture (DC), & Society, Culture, and Ethics (SCE)
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

HIST 4002: From Natural Law to Human Rights?

people making a shape of scale on the ground

M/W 2:30PM - 3:50PM
Dr. Susan Longfield Karr

Although Human Rights issues continue to be debated and contested, the longer history and intellectual tradition of Human Rights is often unexamined and even forgotten. Our contemporary understanding of the content and force of rights globally through international law as well as humanitarian actions has grown out of earlier roots in the Natural Law and Natural Rights traditions in the West. In this course, we will trace the changes and continuities of debates and claims about rights throughout the late-medieval and early modern periods in order to explore how rights are historically asserted, justified, and defended before turning to the transformation of rights--from natural to human--in relation to the American and French Revolutions. At the end of this course students will have acquired an understanding of and critical perspective on the history of rights traditions that inform the Human Rights documents and regimes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
BCs: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Knowledge Integration, Social Responsibility

Research Seminars

HIST 5000: History Research Seminar

Infographic of steps to writing paper, including research

Tu 3:00PM - 5:50PM
Dr. Rebecca Wingo

History 5000 research seminars are the capstone courses for the History major in which students complete a significant research paper of approximately 20-25 pages. Students research a topic of their choice and are guided both by the course instructor and any other faculty member with expertise in the research area. The courses are purposefully small in order to offer majors a structured and supportive environment in which to sharpen their historical skills. Before enrolling in History 5000, students must have completed History 3000 (with a grade of C or higher) as well as one 4000-level course.

5000-Level History Colloquia

Our History 5100 courses are small, intensive reading colloquia that bring together advanced undergraduates and graduate students to explore selected historical topics or themes.  Examples of these courses include the History of the Ottoman Empire, War and Peace in Early Modern Europe, the History of Medicine in America, and Beauty and Fashion in Europe and the United States Since the 1800s.  If you are considering applying for graduate school in history, courses at this level are a perfect choice as these advanced colloquia will give you a preview of the focused seminar experience that is a regular part of graduate history instruction.  

HIST 5129: Making Knowledge: Culture, Technology, and Ideas in World History

T/Th 4:00PM -6:50PM
Dr. Willard Sunderland
Notes: This is a combined section class. 

This course explores the production of varieties of knowledge, the technologies involved in their production, and the ways in which culture mediates their transmission. The course begins with an overview of key historiographical debates between historians of ideas and then moves to case studies concerning orality and literacy, manuscript and print cultures, and the translation and incorporation of medical, scientific, and artistic texts around the world from ancient times through the twentieth century.

Internship Courses

HIST 3160: History Intership

Internships provide students with practical professional experience, under the guidance of specialists, in an institution whose purposes and activities are related to an area of public history (for example, historic preservation, museums, archives). Terms and hours will be arranged with individual students, institutions and faculty supervisors. - By Permission Only