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McMicken College of Arts & SciencesMcMicken College of Arts & SciencesUniversity of Cincinnati

McMicken College of Arts & Sciences

Freshmen Seminars

The freshmen seminar program offers first year students the opportunity to explore an intellectually stimulating scholarly topic in the company of a small group of fellow students and a faculty member of the college. Each seminar satisfies a core requirement of the college, and introduces or develops one or more Baccalaureate Competencies (critical thinking, effective communication, knowledge integration, social responsibility), while introducing students to the expectations of college-level work.

Spring 2015

Health and Wellness (AFST1022, 308384)
TR 9:30am-10:50am, Whembolua

  • This course is designed to address health issues of populations living in the United States, using a multi-disciplinary perspective entailing history, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, biology and genetics, epidemiology, and public health.  We will discuss health care resources and practices that can help individuals to achieve better health and wellness in areas such as exercise, stress, nutrition, weight management, drugs and alcohol, violence, sexually transmitted diseases. Students will be provided with a comprehensive overview of historical forces and social factors related to the health behavior.  Additionally, students will analyze the impact of cultural, educational, social, economic, political and environmental influences on health of African Americans.
    BOK: DC, SS

The Arabs and The West (ARAB1094, 304154)
TR 2:00pm-3:20pm, Cadora

  • The course  provides an introduction to the historical, cultural, and political interrelationships between the Arabs and the West, through selected films, novels, and documentaries.  In our discussions, we will examine the history and structure of the Arab-American community in the United States,  analyze recent social and cultural changes in Arab societies, and  assesses the impact of increasingly global and mobile lifestyles on family structure, public space, and private life.
    BOK: HU, DC

Intro to Animal Behavior (BIOL1002, 304154)
W 5:30pm-8:20pm, Lessnau

  • This course is designed for the non-science major and will begin by discussing basic ecological concepts, levels of organization in ecology, the role of an organism as an individual and its role in the population, community and biome. Biome distribution will be discussed with an emphasis on species diversity including ecological equivalents, endemic species, convergent evolution and the relevant need for conservation of species and habitats worldwide. Basic animal behavior will be described, including feeding strategies, mating behaviors, migration, social behaviors and animal communication. Tours of the Zoo's animal exhibits and in class animal demonstrations will support and illustrate class discussions.
    BOK: NS

Intro to Animal Behavior (BIOL1002, 304154)
W 5:30pm-8:20pm, Wingate

  • See above description.

    BOK: NS

Communication and Culture (COMM1050, 304581)
TR 12:30pm-1:50pm, Talbot

  • This seminar introduces freshmen to topics in communication that pertain to the development of insights into the human condition and the making of meaning. Students will analyze primary documents, discuss common readings, and complete appropriate assignments based on research with secondary and primary sources.
    BOK: HU

Baseball Literature (ENGL1018, 301827)
MWF 2:30pm-3:25pm, Hennessey

  • For more than 150 years, baseball has not only been our national pastime, but also a source of inspiration for some of this country’s finest writers. As we endure another dormant winter, awaiting the promise of spring and a new season on the diamond, we’ll explore the very best that baseball’s literary canon has to offer, from classic novels (Malamud’s The Natural, Coover’s The Universal Baseball Association…, Delillo’s Pafko at the Wall, Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe, Roth’s The Great American Novel and Harbach’sThe Art of Fielding), to short fiction, poetry and even experimental hybrids. Along the way, we’ll consider the meaning and metaphors baseball gives to our ordinary lives and the lessons offered by its heroes and tragedies.
    BOK: HU

Medical Humanities (ENGL1018, 301976)
TR 8:00am-9:20am, Reutter

  • Often we think of issues of health and medicine in a scientific light without considering the great extent to which they are in fact humanitarian matters.  Many students in applied mental or physical health care fields, for instance, nursing and social work, receive specific practical preparation for working with patients and clients.  And yet, whether we or anyone we love is on the giving or receiving end of health care of any sort--from the laboratory to the doctor's office, from the cradle to the grave--we are all affected by the humanitarian aspects of the medical arts.  A study of literature and film involving medical and health care issues allows for exploration and critical thinking, and  indeed "helps to develop and nurture skills of observation, analysis, empathy, and self-reflection."  This course will be comprised of five units: The Tyranny of the Normal; Death and Dying; Cancer and AIDS Narratives; Issues of Race, Gender, and Class; and Ethics in Research and Patient Care.  Other issues addressed are children's rights, ageism, disabilities, spirituality, and aesthetics.  Genres of study may include plays, essays, films, short stories, novels, poetry, creative nonfiction, and television mini-series. Writers of note include Susan Sontag, Audre Lorde, Sharon Olds, Jodi Picoult, Oliver Sacks, and others.
    BOK: HU

Tasting France (FREN1042, 300250)
MWF 2:30pm-3:25pm, Jezquel

  • What makes France unique? French food of course! This course will explore a fascinating story: how the traditions of France came to dominate the culinary world. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the culture and identity of France through its culinary traditions. They will learn the history and geography of this unique French passion, discovering texts, cookbooks, movies, and cooking shows.
    BOK: HU, DC

Surface Processes (GEOL1002C, 305699)
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Owen

  • No description at this time.
    BOK: NS

Salt in World History (HIST1099, 309349)
W 6:00pm-8:50pm, Kwan

  • Do you know that the word salary derives from salarium (salt as part of the soldiers' pay in Roman times)? The role of salt in the French Revolution? The American Civil War? Indian independence? This course explores the role and significance of salt in its many guises (as a symbol of purity, an article of trade, a strategic material, a source of revenue) in world history.
    BOK: HP

Memoirs and History (HIST1099, 309357)
MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm, Oconnor

  • Memoirs document childhood and the process of coming of age in ways that few other kinds of sources do or can -- they are psychological, physical, and emotional but also importantly historical as well. In this seminar, we shall explore memoirs as a less conventional approach to the archive and to the writing and understanding of social and cultural history. Most of our required reading centers on memoirs drawn from what I call literary popular culture, chosen to represent generational interpretations of growing up in different places in the United States from the late 1950s through the 1980s.  While considering the different forms that memoirs take, we shall explore how these forms are connected to these authors’ highly individualized representations of memory, emotion, imagination, and place. These interpretations are often bound to particular historically contingent attitudes, values, expectations as well as laws, rules, and customs. These environments range (across time and geographical place) from neighborhoods and communities to the most intimate spaces of houses, apartments, and a child’s imagination and memory. And very importantly, we will examine the ways in which so many of these stories involve a growing awareness in childhood of differences and distinctions of all kinds that are internalized, understood, and worked out in a variety of ways that these authors reveal in the telling of their stories.
    BOK: HP

Merchant of Venice (HIST1099, 309364)
TR 12:30pm-1:50pm, Raider

  • This course examines William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice (c. 1596) in historical and cultural perspective. It explores the place of the Jews in premodern Christian European society and the backdrop against which Shakespeare composed Merchant. A close reading and in-depth study of the play serves as a vehicle for examining the social, economic, and political status of the Jews in the early modern period. In addition to analytic literature, the course also investigates significant primary sources. Film versions of Merchant will be used to illustrate the play’s iconic status in Western theatrical tradition and raise questions about the complexity of Jewish stereotypes, artistic representation, and historical reconstruction. Like other Freshman Seminars, this class is designed as a highly interactive, small enrollment seminar. No prior knowledge of the subject is presumed.
    BOK: HP

One Bible, Two Religions (JUDC1050, 304917)
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Finkelstein

  • The Hebrew Bible, which Christians call the "Old Testament," is the basis of both Judaism and Christianity. In this course we shall survey how this work of literature, through divergent interpretation and re-interpretation, shaped two different religious and cultural systems. We will consider differences in practice and belief, and examine the roots of these differences by exploring areas where Jewish and Christian authors disagree on the meaning of the Bible’s message, focusing on controversial passages that have been the subject of debate between Christians and Jews since Paul.
    BOK: HU, DC

Democratic Citizenship (POL2013, 305334)
MWF 3:35pm-4:30pm, Conger

  • Citizenship is a concept that is taken for granted, yet is increasingly complicated by the concerns of the modern world. The goal of this course is to make students aware of and reflect upon what citizenship means both in the United States and elsewhere. The class begins with an exploration of the theories and premises of citizenship and continues with a consideration of the factors that challenge these concepts. Next, students will contemplate citizenship beyond legal definitions, exploring the notions of obligation, citizen responsibility, and civic engagement. The class will conclude with a study of citizenship in the United States in order to apply the concepts learned and discover what it means to be a citizen in this country.
    BOK: SS, SE

In The Beginning (PHYS1010, 305051)
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, Scanio

  • A detailed treatment of the physics of the first three minutes of the existence of the universe, with special emphasis on current ideas in cosmology and unified theories of elementary particle physics.
    BOK: NS

Revolutionary Women (WGS1051, 305760)
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Currier

  • This course examines women's participation over time and in varying parts of the world in movements for social change, whether through participating in actual revolutions for national liberation or working for causes that revolutionized ways of thinking about culture and society. The course will consider women's participation in revolutionary work at the individual, societal, and global levels.
    BOK: DC, SE

Outrageous Writings (WGS1052, 305761)
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Currier

  • This Freshman Seminar examines fiction, poetry, drama, oratory, and political rhetoric that can be read as "outrageous," either contemporaneously or in its historical context. The course will consider why certain forms and/or content is or has been deemed "outrageous".
    BOK: HU, DC

 

Fall 2014


Health and Wellness (AFST1022, 208865)
MWF 10:10pm-11:05pm, Wallace

  • This freshman course is designed to address health issues of populations  living  in the United States. This course discusses health care resources and practices that can help individuals to achieve better health and wellness in areas such as exercise, stress, nutrition, weight  management, drugs and alcohol, violence, sexually transmitted diseases. Students will be provided with a comprehensive overview of historical forces and social factors related to the health behavior. A multidisciplinary perspective entailing history, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, biology and genetics, epidemiology, and public health will be offered by way of reading assignments, didactic instruction, class discussions and course assignments.
    BOK: DC, SS

Language and Globalization (Anth1019, 205791)
MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm, Millar

  • From social media to the new economy and global pop culture, new ways of communicating and using language are both the product and the vehicle of the economic, political and cultural changes associated with globalization. Taking an ethnographic approach, this course looks at how globalization is transforming the ways we use language in contemporary society, while critically reflecting on how new patterns of communication also contribute to structures of inequality on a global scale.
    BOK: DC, SS

At the Zoo:  Animal Behavior (BIOL1002, 207587)
W 5:30pm-8:20pm, Wingate

  • This course is designed for non-science majors and will begin by discussing basic animal classification with an emphasis on animals displayed at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. Classes of animals that will be discussed include but are not limited to mammalia, aves, amphibia, reptilia, chondrichthyes and osteichthyes. Other taxa discussed include superclass agnatha and phylum arthropoda with an emphasis on class insecta. Basic characteristics and adaptations of these taxa will be discussed. Basic ecological principles will be described including evolution, adaptations to environmental pressures and population and community ecology. Many of the taxa will be observed through Zoo tours and live animal demonstrations that will emphasize the animal's characteristics, adaptations, evolutionary relationships and basic ecological concepts.
    BOK: NS

At the Zoo:  Animal Behavior (BIOL1002, 207587)
W 5:30pm-8:20pm, Christopher

  • This course is designed for non-science majors and will begin by discussing basic animal classification with an emphasis on animals displayed at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. Classes of animals that will be discussed include but are not limited to mammalia, aves, amphibia, reptilia, chondrichthyes and osteichthyes. Other taxa discussed include superclass agnatha and phylum arthropoda with an emphasis on class insecta. Basic characteristics and adaptations of these taxa will be discussed. Basic ecological principles will be described including evolution, adaptations to environmental pressures and population and community ecology. Many of the taxa will be observed through Zoo tours and live animal demonstrations that will emphasize the animal's characteristics, adaptations, evolutionary relationships and basic ecological concepts.
    BOK: NS

Sustainable Energy and Society (CHEM1008, 203407)
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, Beck

  • This course is intended to introduce students to the important topic of energy usage in our society, and the role of chemistry in the development of renewable energy sources. The course will cover the history of human energy usage, a detailed analysis of current energy sources and their consequences, and potential alternative sources of energy. The students will engage in projects aimed at proposing scenarios for future energy production that both fills our growing needs and minimizes environmental impacts.
    BOK: NS

Communication and Culture (COMM1050, 202508)
TR 9:30am-10:50am, Jackson

  • Communication & Culture is a course that introduces students to the basic concepts and theories related to intercultural communication.  Students will explore cultural dynamics in varying popular and contemporary contexts.
    BOK: HU

Communication and Society (COMM1055, 202510)
TR 11:00am-12:20pm, Owens

  • This seminar introduces freshmen to topics in communication that examine the diverse personal, interpersonal, and societal factors that shape communication in everyday life. Students will analyze primary documents, discuss common readings, and complete appropriate assignments based on research with secondary and primary sources.
    BOK: SS

Communication and Society (COMM1055, 202510)
TR 6:00pm-8:50pm, Owens

  • This seminar introduces freshmen to topics in communication that examine the diverse personal, interpersonal, and societal factors that shape communication in everyday life. Students will analyze primary documents, discuss common readings, and complete appropriate assignments based on research with secondary and primary sources.
    BOK: SS

English Composition: Rhetoric in History (ENGL1002, 209373)
MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm, Beckelhimer

  • Students in this writing-intensive seminar will examine how historical texts teach, persuade, mold, confirm, defend, or otherwise represent history. Possible topics for discussion, reading, and writing include: 9/11, the Holocaust, the sinking of the Titanic, Japanese internment camps, and Hurricane Katrina, as well as contemporary events. Possible texts for analysis and research include: online archives, websites, blogs, and social networking sites; annual reports and legal or government documents; museum exhibits; films and documentaries; and academic, mainstream, and journalistic writing. Writing assignments will include textual analysis, multimedia argument, and an analytical research project focused on the rhetoric associated with a local historical or current social or political event of personal interest to each student. Guest speakers and a field trip to one of Cincinnati’s excellent museums are likely.
    BOK: EC

Counter-Cultural Literature (ENGL1018, 204985)
TR 3:30pm-4:50pm, Hennessey

  • In this class we'll focus on a short (but tremendously important) period in postwar American history where a burgeoning countercultural movement — known as The Beat Generation — radically changed the course of the 20th century, openly defying prevailing societal conventions, and in the process breathed joy and life into a stoic nation.  Specifically, we'll take a close look at the group's early development in New York City, with readings including fiction by Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs and poetry by Allen Ginsberg and Gregory Corso.  We'll end the term with a critical reconsideration of the period through the eyes of the Beats' female contemporaries (Joyce Johnson, Hettie Jones, Carolyn Cassady, Elise Cowen).
    BOK: HU

Writing and Running (ENGL1018, 204988)
MWF 1:25pm-2:20pm, Micciche

  • In his memoir entitled What I Talk About When I Talk About Running, Haruki Murakami writes, “What exactly do I think about when I’m running? I don’t have a clue…I just run. I run in a void. Or maybe I should put it the other way: I run in order to acquire a void.” This void, similar to the “runner’s high” or “the zone” that runners achieve upon hitting the pavement, is not unlike the immersion in ideas and language that writers experience when entangled in writing. In this class, we’ll explore how writers like Murakami, Joyce Carol Oates, Don DeLillo, Mona Simpson, Susan Orlean, among others, link writing and running. We’ll also read about kinesthetic learning theoy, which emphasizes the importance of physical activity to learning processes. Assignments will include formal and informal writing assignments, a runner’s log, and a mini-tour narrative of Cincinnati by foot. Class time will include short running excursions around Clifton.
    BOK: HU

American Literature and Environment (ENGL1018, 204991)
MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm, Person

  • A seminar devoted to examining selected novels, memoirs, and films that feature human beings encountering nature or dealing with environmental problems, such as pollution, nuclear waste contamination, fracking, global warming, and others.  As foundational texts, we shall read Henry David Thoreau’s Walden and Aldo Leopold’s Sand County Almanac.  We will also read more recent memoirs and novels, such as Molly Gloss’s Wild Life, Barbara Kingsolver’s Flight Behavior, Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony, Linda Hogan’s Solar Storms, Terry Tempest Williams’ Refuge, and/or Lamar Herrin’s Fractures.  Films may include Soylent Green, Erin Brockovich, The Day After Tomorrow, and/or Promised Land.
    BOK: HU

Writing, Song, and Image (ENGL1018, 204992)
TR 9:30am-10:50am, Carlson

  • How did today’s popular culture of song emerge from the popular culture of the past?  What ballads and tales captured the eighteenth and nineteenth British imagination?  How did they mix word, image, melody, and meter/rhythm to tell compelling stories?  After considering a few illustrated fairy tales and a range of popular ballads (from anti-slavery ballads to tales of forbidden love, war, infanticide, and madness), we will consider William Blake’s engraved and painted Songs of Innocence and Experience and the “lyrical ballads” of William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge.  We will read Christina Rossetti’s wild and haunting poem for children, Goblin Market, and other Victorian-era illustrated tales.  Finally, we will listen to contemporary ballads by the likes of Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Simon and Garfunkel, Bonnie Prince Billy and others of students' choosing as we trace the ways in which ballads traveled across the Atlantic over time.
    BOK: HU

Adolescent Film/Fiction (ENGL1018, 204993)
TR 8:00am-9:20am, Dziech

  • This course will examine past and present information as we examine recent discoveries about the adolescent brain that have resulted in greater understanding of values, risk behaviors and flawed judgment which frequently characterize this period. We will use fiction, non-fiction and films as bases for analyzing, discussing, and debating the challenges facing male and female adolescents and post-adolescents and the ways in which they respond to them.
    BOK: HU

An introduction to the Medical Humanities (ENGL1018, 204994)
TR 8:00am-9:20am, Reutter

  • Often we think of issues of health and medicine in a scientific light without considering the great extent to which they are, in fact, humanitarian matters.  Whether we or anyone we love is on the giving or receiving end of health care of any sort--from the laboratory to the doctor's office, from the cradle to the grave--we are all affected by the humanitarian aspects of the medical arts.  A study of literature and film involving medical and health care issues allows for exploration and critical thinking, and indeed "helps to develop and nurture skills of observation, analysis, empathy, and self-reflection."   This course will be comprised of five units: The Tyranny of the Normal; Death, Dying, and Grief; Cancer and AIDS Narratives; Issues of Race, Gender, and Class; and Ethics in Research and Patient Care.  Other issues addressed are Children's Rights, Ageism, Disabilities, Spirituality, and Aesthetics.  Genres of study may include plays, essays, films, short stories, short stories, novels, poetry, creative nonfiction, and television mini-series. Writers of note include Susan Sontag, Audre Lorde, Sharon Olds, Martha Stephens, Jodi Picoult, Oliver Sacks, and others.
    BOK: HU

Imagining America (ENGL1018, 205000)
TR 12:30pm-1:50pm, Norton

  • In this course we will read, discuss, and write about several selections of African American literature, primarily essays and fiction, paying particular attention to how black writers have imagined concepts of race and racial difference, and paying close attention as well to how gender, class, and culture intersect to inform these writers’ understandings of race. These writers take many different approaches, but all, in one way or another, seek to understand and describe the culture and history of black America as a way of understanding race, and use fictional characters to explore the gendered and psychological aspects of racial identity.  We will also look at the complex ways in which humor operates in some writers’ understanding of race.  All of these aspects of the literature will be examined while we also pay close attention to how literary texts are structured, and how writers use language and imagery to represent histories, cultures and ideas.  Writers studied may include Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Michael Thomas, Colson Whitehead, among others.
    BOK: HU

Diamonds and Furies (FREN1042, 202177)
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, Hartman

  • A freshman seminar of power plays, games and personalities in the last days of absolute kings.  Student-driven Internet sourcing of  people, events, scenarios for Louis the Last, soldiers, spies, harlots, zealots and conmen of Versailles.
    BOK: HU, DC

Mapping Climate Change (GEOG1065, 208507)
TR 11:00am-12:20pm, Beck

  • Students will create maps using GIS software and aircraft and satellite data to study the causes and solutions to global climate change and explore the most cost-effective methods and the best locations to reduce global warming. This is a user friendly, hands-on course using state-of-the-art mapping tools, articles, videos and in class lectures.
    BOK: NS

Legacies and Landscapes of Yucatan (GEOG1073, 203510)
W 2:00pm-4:45pm, South

  • "Legacies and Landscapes of Yucatan" is a freshman seminar that studies the changes in the landscape of Mexico's Yucatan peninsula over time, going back to 300 AD, focusing on the human impact on the environment through time and space. Concepts such as "environmental determinism" will be discussed. Additionally, the course provides students with an opportunity to explore and learn in a foreign setting, via a winter-break field trip to the Yucatan, where they can practice language skills, appreciate different cultures, and become aware of world problems in a third world setting. The course methodology includes field work, observation, journal writing, and interactive experiences.
    BOK: DC, SS

Geology and Paleontology (GEOL1001C, 203510)
R 3:30pm-4:45pm, Brett

  • This course, the first of a two-part sequence of freshmen seminars, is designed to give introductory students a broad understanding of basic geological principles and to introduce processes in Earth and life history that occur on the scale of millions of years. In particular, it emphasizes the geologic history -- a mixture of geological and biological concepts -- of eastern North America, a world-famous area for Paleozoic rocks and fossils. This seminar provides an overview of the tools by which Earth scientists interpret physical and life history, the depth of geologic time, and the forces that shape our planet's surface. This course incorporates a mixture of class and lab experiences designed to introduce students to the broad concepts of geology largely through field observations and laboratory exploration of data and specimens.  Students do not need special background for these classes, but should have a natural curiosity, an eagerness to learn, and a willingness to work in outdoor field situations on day-long trips. Students completing this course will be well prepared to pursue further studies in geology, paleontology, or other natural sciences.
    BOK: NS

Earth, Sea, and Sky (GEOL1020, 209605)
TR 11:00am-12:20pm, Ward

  • Seen from space, Earth is a "blue planet" blanketed in an atmosphere, covered in oceans and glaciers, and dappled with vegetation. This course is an introduction to earth science through the study of its interconnected systems -- the solid earth (minerals and resources, topography, plate tectonics), the hydrosphere (oceans, glaciers, the water cycle), and the atmosphere (wind, weather, climate) -- with a focus on the interactions between these systems.  Students will use Google Earth, digital topography, and interactive simulations of the basic physics to enhance understanding of the processes that make the Earth a dynamic and exciting place to live.
    BOK: NS

Exploring Languages & Intercultural Competence (HIST1000, 202115)
MWF 1:25pm-2:20pm, Lorenz

  • This Freshman Seminar course uses readings, guest lectures from language department faculty and international campus services, and participation in international events on campus and in the community to introduce skills and concepts required for language study and intercultural competence.   This course emphasizes the importance of language as component of cultural identity and develops sensitivity toward the values and norms of other cultures.
    BOK: DC

Pregnancy & Birth (HIST1099, 207449)
T 2:00pm-4:40pm, Kline

  • This UC Forward Freshman Seminar integrates historical and sociological readings on women's health with community action through service learning. Consistent with the aims of Medical Humanities, students will study the historical, social, and political issues surrounding reproductive issues - namely, childbirth, pregnancy, midwifery, prematurity, pregnancy loss and infant mortality, adoption, abortion, infertility, and birth control. We will pay special attention to differences of gender, race, and class. Students will be invited to reflect on course material through in-class exercises and assignments that develop writing skills and critical thinking. In addition, in order to fulfill the service-learning component, students will work in groups to build strategies and provide evidence-based resources for local Cincinnati advocacy organizations.
    BOK: HP

India on Film (HIST1099, 207469)
T 3:30pm-6:20pm, Paik

  • This course examines the history of South Asia since 1880 through a medium of media and scholarly and non-scholarly literature. We will concentrate on the impact of colonialism on the Indian subcontinent and on the formation of the modern South Asian States of India and Pakistan through historically-based films.
    BOK: HP

Topics in Journalism (JOUR1020, 209562)
TR 12:30pm-1:50pm, Yancey

  • No matter their culture, when the voiceless need a voice, they turn to the press. When the press ignores them, they become the press. This class highlights the important role played by journalism across varied cultures, from the Black press that helped spur the Civil Rights Movement to the Latino voices that call for justice and equality to the voices of the Middle East that explore the boundaries of what it means to have a free press. The class explores the evolution of multicultural journalism and journalists on the local, national and international scene and their current trajectory as they create new avenues for understanding across multiple media platforms, including online and social media.

Creation Stories (JUDC1050, 205019)
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, Brolley

  • An overview and comparison of different accounts of the creation of the universe and the origins of humankind. The course will focus on writings from the Near East, including but going beyond the standard biblical accounts, with discussions of modern religious and cultural perspectives.
    BOK: DC, HU

Drugs, Disease, and the Brain (NS1053, 206386)
TR 2:00pm-3:20pm, Vilinsky

  • Psychoactive drugs and brain disease have long been both fascinating and frightening.  This introductory course will survey drugs and disease, using their effects as "natural experiments" to probe how the brain really works.  In the process, students will get an introduction to neuroscience both at the cellular/molecular and whole systems level.
    BOK: NS

Urban Poverty and "The Wire" (SOC1060, 206169)
TR 11:00am-12:20pm, Timberlake

  • This course will concern the core sociological concept of “social context,” and the core sociological idea that social context deeply influences individual thought and behavior. The case the course examines is the effects of neighborhood context on individuals and families who live in the inner cities of the United States. We will examine these issues through lectures, readings, and viewings and discussion of the HBO series The Wire.
    BOK: SS, SE

Pregnancy & Birth (SOC1099, 206171)
T 2:00pm-4:40pm, Bessett

  • This UC Forward Freshman Seminar integrates historical and sociological readings on women's health with community action through service learning. Consistent with the aims of Medical Humanities, students will study the historical, social, and political issues surrounding reproductive issues - namely, childbirth, pregnancy, midwifery, prematurity, pregnancy loss and infant mortality, adoption, abortion, infertility, and birth control. We will pay special attention to differences of gender, race, and class. Students will be invited to reflect on course material through in-class exercises and assignments that develop writing skills and critical thinking. In addition, in order to fulfill the service-learning component, students will work in groups to build strategies and provide evidence-based resources for local Cincinnati advocacy organizations.
    BOK: HP