McMicken College of Arts & SciencesMcMicken College of Arts & SciencesUniversity of Cincinnati

McMicken College of Arts & Sciences

Freshmen Seminars

The freshmen seminar program offers first year students the opportunity to explore an intellectually stimulating scholarly topic in the company of a small group of fellow students and a faculty member of the college. Each seminar satisfies a core requirement of the college, and introduces or develops one or more Baccalaureate Competencies (critical thinking, effective communication, knowledge integration, social responsibility), while introducing students to the expectations of college-level work.

Spring 2015

Health and Wellness (AFST1022, 308384)
TR 9:30am-10:50am, Whembolua

  • This course is designed to address health issues of populations living in the United States, using a multi-disciplinary perspective entailing history, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, biology and genetics, epidemiology, and public health.  We will discuss health care resources and practices that can help individuals to achieve better health and wellness in areas such as exercise, stress, nutrition, weight management, drugs and alcohol, violence, sexually transmitted diseases. Students will be provided with a comprehensive overview of historical forces and social factors related to the health behavior.  Additionally, students will analyze the impact of cultural, educational, social, economic, political and environmental influences on health of African Americans.
    BOK: DC, SS

The Arabs and The West (ARAB1094, 304154)
TR 2:00pm-3:20pm, Cadora

  • The course  provides an introduction to the historical, cultural, and political interrelationships between the Arabs and the West, through selected films, novels, and documentaries.  In our discussions, we will examine the history and structure of the Arab-American community in the United States,  analyze recent social and cultural changes in Arab societies, and  assesses the impact of increasingly global and mobile lifestyles on family structure, public space, and private life.
    BOK: HU, DC

Intro to Animal Behavior (BIOL1002, 304154)
W 5:30pm-8:20pm, Lessnau

  • This course is designed for the non-science major and will begin by discussing basic ecological concepts, levels of organization in ecology, the role of an organism as an individual and its role in the population, community and biome. Biome distribution will be discussed with an emphasis on species diversity including ecological equivalents, endemic species, convergent evolution and the relevant need for conservation of species and habitats worldwide. Basic animal behavior will be described, including feeding strategies, mating behaviors, migration, social behaviors and animal communication. Tours of the Zoo's animal exhibits and in class animal demonstrations will support and illustrate class discussions.
    BOK: NS

Intro to Animal Behavior (BIOL1002, 304154)
W 5:30pm-8:20pm, Wingate

  • See above description.

    BOK: NS

Communication and Culture (COMM1050, 304581)
TR 12:30pm-1:50pm, Talbot

  • This seminar introduces freshmen to topics in communication that pertain to the development of insights into the human condition and the making of meaning. Students will analyze primary documents, discuss common readings, and complete appropriate assignments based on research with secondary and primary sources.
    BOK: HU

Baseball Literature (ENGL1018, 301827)
MWF 2:30pm-3:25pm, Hennessey

  • For more than 150 years, baseball has not only been our national pastime, but also a source of inspiration for some of this country’s finest writers. As we endure another dormant winter, awaiting the promise of spring and a new season on the diamond, we’ll explore the very best that baseball’s literary canon has to offer, from classic novels (Malamud’s The Natural, Coover’s The Universal Baseball Association…, Delillo’s Pafko at the Wall, Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe, Roth’s The Great American Novel and Harbach’sThe Art of Fielding), to short fiction, poetry and even experimental hybrids. Along the way, we’ll consider the meaning and metaphors baseball gives to our ordinary lives and the lessons offered by its heroes and tragedies.
    BOK: HU

Medical Humanities (ENGL1018, 301976)
TR 8:00am-9:20am, Reutter

  • Often we think of issues of health and medicine in a scientific light without considering the great extent to which they are in fact humanitarian matters.  Many students in applied mental or physical health care fields, for instance, nursing and social work, receive specific practical preparation for working with patients and clients.  And yet, whether we or anyone we love is on the giving or receiving end of health care of any sort--from the laboratory to the doctor's office, from the cradle to the grave--we are all affected by the humanitarian aspects of the medical arts.  A study of literature and film involving medical and health care issues allows for exploration and critical thinking, and  indeed "helps to develop and nurture skills of observation, analysis, empathy, and self-reflection."  This course will be comprised of five units: The Tyranny of the Normal; Death and Dying; Cancer and AIDS Narratives; Issues of Race, Gender, and Class; and Ethics in Research and Patient Care.  Other issues addressed are children's rights, ageism, disabilities, spirituality, and aesthetics.  Genres of study may include plays, essays, films, short stories, novels, poetry, creative nonfiction, and television mini-series. Writers of note include Susan Sontag, Audre Lorde, Sharon Olds, Jodi Picoult, Oliver Sacks, and others.
    BOK: HU

Tasting France (FREN1042, 300250)
MWF 2:30pm-3:25pm, Jezquel

  • What makes France unique? French food of course! This course will explore a fascinating story: how the traditions of France came to dominate the culinary world. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the culture and identity of France through its culinary traditions. They will learn the history and geography of this unique French passion, discovering texts, cookbooks, movies, and cooking shows.
    BOK: HU, DC

Surface Processes (GEOL1002C, 305699)
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Owen

  • No description at this time.
    BOK: NS

Salt in World History (HIST1099, 309349)
W 6:00pm-8:50pm, Kwan

  • Do you know that the word salary derives from salarium (salt as part of the soldiers' pay in Roman times)? The role of salt in the French Revolution? The American Civil War? Indian independence? This course explores the role and significance of salt in its many guises (as a symbol of purity, an article of trade, a strategic material, a source of revenue) in world history.
    BOK: HP

Memoirs and History (HIST1099, 309357)
MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm, Oconnor

  • Memoirs document childhood and the process of coming of age in ways that few other kinds of sources do or can -- they are psychological, physical, and emotional but also importantly historical as well. In this seminar, we shall explore memoirs as a less conventional approach to the archive and to the writing and understanding of social and cultural history. Most of our required reading centers on memoirs drawn from what I call literary popular culture, chosen to represent generational interpretations of growing up in different places in the United States from the late 1950s through the 1980s.  While considering the different forms that memoirs take, we shall explore how these forms are connected to these authors’ highly individualized representations of memory, emotion, imagination, and place. These interpretations are often bound to particular historically contingent attitudes, values, expectations as well as laws, rules, and customs. These environments range (across time and geographical place) from neighborhoods and communities to the most intimate spaces of houses, apartments, and a child’s imagination and memory. And very importantly, we will examine the ways in which so many of these stories involve a growing awareness in childhood of differences and distinctions of all kinds that are internalized, understood, and worked out in a variety of ways that these authors reveal in the telling of their stories.
    BOK: HP

Merchant of Venice (HIST1099, 309364)
TR 12:30pm-1:50pm, Raider

  • This course examines William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice (c. 1596) in historical and cultural perspective. It explores the place of the Jews in premodern Christian European society and the backdrop against which Shakespeare composed Merchant. A close reading and in-depth study of the play serves as a vehicle for examining the social, economic, and political status of the Jews in the early modern period. In addition to analytic literature, the course also investigates significant primary sources. Film versions of Merchant will be used to illustrate the play’s iconic status in Western theatrical tradition and raise questions about the complexity of Jewish stereotypes, artistic representation, and historical reconstruction. Like other Freshman Seminars, this class is designed as a highly interactive, small enrollment seminar. No prior knowledge of the subject is presumed.
    BOK: HP

One Bible, Two Religions (JUDC1050, 304917)
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Finkelstein

  • The Hebrew Bible, which Christians call the "Old Testament," is the basis of both Judaism and Christianity. In this course we shall survey how this work of literature, through divergent interpretation and re-interpretation, shaped two different religious and cultural systems. We will consider differences in practice and belief, and examine the roots of these differences by exploring areas where Jewish and Christian authors disagree on the meaning of the Bible’s message, focusing on controversial passages that have been the subject of debate between Christians and Jews since Paul.
    BOK: HU, DC

Democratic Citizenship (POL2013, 305334)
MWF 3:35pm-4:30pm, Conger

  • Citizenship is a concept that is taken for granted, yet is increasingly complicated by the concerns of the modern world. The goal of this course is to make students aware of and reflect upon what citizenship means both in the United States and elsewhere. The class begins with an exploration of the theories and premises of citizenship and continues with a consideration of the factors that challenge these concepts. Next, students will contemplate citizenship beyond legal definitions, exploring the notions of obligation, citizen responsibility, and civic engagement. The class will conclude with a study of citizenship in the United States in order to apply the concepts learned and discover what it means to be a citizen in this country.
    BOK: SS, SE

In The Beginning (PHYS1010, 305051)
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, Scanio

  • A detailed treatment of the physics of the first three minutes of the existence of the universe, with special emphasis on current ideas in cosmology and unified theories of elementary particle physics.
    BOK: NS

Revolutionary Women (WGS1051, 305760)
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Currier

  • This course examines women's participation over time and in varying parts of the world in movements for social change, whether through participating in actual revolutions for national liberation or working for causes that revolutionized ways of thinking about culture and society. The course will consider women's participation in revolutionary work at the individual, societal, and global levels.
    BOK: DC, SE

Outrageous Writings (WGS1052, 305761)
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Currier

  • This Freshman Seminar examines fiction, poetry, drama, oratory, and political rhetoric that can be read as "outrageous," either contemporaneously or in its historical context. The course will consider why certain forms and/or content is or has been deemed "outrageous".
    BOK: HU, DC

Fall 2015

Vodou (AFST1021, 506292)
MWF 1:25pm-2:20pm, Braziel

  • This freshman seminar introduces students to Haitian Vodou through music, dance, drumming, ceremonies, and other forms of religious and ritualistic praxis, as well as the core beliefs of the religion, while dispelling negative stereotypes about “Voodoo” that are pervasive in the United States (and in other parts of the world). Vodou is an eclectic and synthesized blend of “old world” African religious traditions and rituals—Yoruban, Congolese, Ibo, Dahomeyan, among others—and “new world” faiths and practices—particularly elements of indigenous belief from the Taino inhabitants of the island of Hispaniola—and the Catholicism imported by Spanish and French colonialists in the Caribbean. We will read texts, watch films, study art, analyze dance, listen to music, and think critically about Vodou as an important religious tradition in the Americas and in the country of Haiti. By the end of the semester, we will know the difference between Vodou and the fantasies and fictions of American consciousness distilled in the stereotypes of “Voodoo.” And students will have a new appreciation for the beliefs, practices, and rituals of Haiti’s dominant religion.
    BOK: HU, DC

Health and Wellness (AFST1022, 506342)
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, Wallace

  • This freshman seminar provides students with a comprehensive hands-on experiential learning experience of Health and Wellness.  Due to the increasing number of health disparities experienced by minority groups, health professionals have repeatedly called for culturally competent approaches to address the complexity and unique nature of ethnic minority communities.  The impact of lifestyle choices on all aspects of personal health will be discussed, including physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, social, and environmental.  Students who take this course will use a variety of social science methods to explore topics related to exercise and fitness, nutrition, stress management, mental health, disease prevention, substance abuse, and healthy relationships. The information and skills necessary for making informed and healthful decisions to promote wellness will be discussed with an emphasis on cultural competence and self-responsibility.  Other goals of this course include: college success, development of the sense of University community, and a shared common educational experience with other freshman.
    BOK: DC, SS

Language and Globalization (Anth1019, 505277)
MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm, Millar

  • From social media to the new economy and global pop culture, new ways of communicating and using language are both the product and the vehicle of the economic, political and cultural changes associated with globalization. Taking an ethnographic approach, this course looks at how globalization is transforming the ways we use language in contemporary society, while critically reflecting on how new patterns of communication also contribute to structures of inequality on a global scale.
    BOK: DC, SS

At the Zoo:  Animal Behavior (BIOL1002, 507297)
W 5:30pm-8:20pm, Wingate

  • This course is designed for the non-science major and will begin by discussing basic ecological concepts, levels of organization in ecology, the role of an organism as an individual and its role in the population, community and biome. Biome distribution will be discussed with an emphasis on species diversity including ecological equivalents, endemic species, convergent evolution and the relevant need for conservation of species and habitats worldwide. Basic animal behavior will be described, including feeding strategies, mating behaviors, migration, social behaviors and animal communication. Tours of the Zoo's animal exhibits and in class animal demonstrations will support and illustrate class discussions.
    BOK: NS

At the Zoo:  Animal Behavior (BIOL1002, 507298)
W 5:30pm-8:20pm, Lesnau

  • This course is designed for the non-science major and will begin by discussing basic ecological concepts, levels of organization in ecology, the role of an organism as an individual and its role in the population, community and biome. Biome distribution will be discussed with an emphasis on species diversity including ecological equivalents, endemic species, convergent evolution and the relevant need for conservation of species and habitats worldwide. Basic animal behavior will be described, including feeding strategies, mating behaviors, migration, social behaviors and animal communication. Tours of the Zoo's animal exhibits and in class animal demonstrations will support and illustrate class discussions.
    BOK: NS

Sustainable Energy and Society (CHEM1008, 500181)
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, Beck

  • This course is intended to introduce students to the important topic of energy usage in our society, and the role of chemistry in the development of renewable energy sources. The course will cover the history of human energy usage, a detailed analysis of current energy sources and their consequences, and potential alternative sources of energy. The students will engage in projects aimed at proposing scenarios for future energy production that both fills our growing needs and minimizes environmental impacts.
    BOK: NS, TI

Intro Interpersonal Communication (COMM1076, 504062)
R 6:00pm-8:50pm, Luccioni

  • Introduction to theory and practice in interpersonal communication. Topics include verbal and nonverbal communication, perception, listening, emotions, relationship development, conflict and power. Focus is on the development of an understanding of fundamental interpersonal dynamics and basic skills.
    BOK: SS

Sports and Society (ENGL1002, 503175)
MWF 12:20pm, Beckelhimer

  • This writing-intensive course also emphasizes critical reading, textual analysis, and development of research skills. This seminar section will explore historical and modern-day sports and their impacts on American and world cultures, athletes, fans, and social issues such as violence, race, gender, nationalism, and politics. Students will study sports through traditional sports writing, but also through websites, advertisements, scholarly essays, films and documentaries, blogs, social media, photographs, and more. Field trips to UC sporting events and/or guest speakers are likely.
    BOK: EC

Rhetoric and Law (ENGL1002, 503177)
MWF 2:30pm-3:25pm, Riz

  • It’s difficult to find news that does not include an element of “the law.”  Students agree that they know a lot about the law from what they see on television and in the movies.  We’ll include, but go beyond, pop culture representations to look at Supreme Court oral arguments, legal pleadings in cases about Internet piracy, and the search for global values in international law in a world where context and meaning is fluid. Current news will be included as well as University rules and regulations to reinforce the idea that the law is immediate, ever-present, and varied.  The course will include a debate on free speech, as well as visits from representatives from the College of law, the Office of Judicial Affairs, and the Ombuds Office. This writing-intensive course also emphasizes critical reading, textual analysis, and development of research skills.
    BOK: EC

Adolescence in Film and Fiction (ENGL1018, 505065)
MWF 9:05am-10:00am, Dziech

  • This course will examine past and present information as we examine recent discoveries about the adolescent brain that have resulted in greater understanding of values, risk behaviors and flawed judgment which frequently characterize this period. We will use fiction, non-fiction and films as bases for analyzing, discussing, and debating the challenges facing male and female adolescents and post-adolescents and the ways in which they respond to them.
    BOK: HU

Huck Finn and his Tradition (ENGL1018, 505071)
TR 11:00am-12:20pm, Person

  • Ernest Hemingway claimed that “all modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn.”  After reading Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, we shall look at the 20th-century “Huck Finn Tradition”—narratives that resemble Huckleberry Finn in many significant ways and seem to engage Clemens’ novel in a conversation about race, gender, class, and other volatile issues.  Course Requirements:  Three 5-page papers or presentations, short in-class writing assignments.
    BOK: HU

Medical Humanities (ENGL1018, 505094)
MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm, Reutter

  • Often we think of issues of health and medicine in a scientific light without considering the great extent to which they are in fact humanitarian matters.  Many students in applied mental or physical health care fields, for instance, nursing and social work, receive specific practical preparation for working with patients and clients.  And yet, whether we or anyone we love is on the giving or receiving end of health care of any sort--from the laboratory to the doctor's office, from the cradle to the grave--we are all affected by the humanitarian aspects of the medical arts.  A study of literature and film involving medical and health care issues allows for exploration and critical thinking, and  indeed "helps to develop and nurture skills of observation, analysis, empathy, and self-reflection."  This course will be comprised of five units: The Tyranny of the Normal; Death and Dying; Cancer and AIDS Narratives; Issues of Race, Gender, and Class; and Ethics in Research and Patient Care.  Other issues addressed are children's rights, ageism, disabilities, spirituality, and aesthetics.  Genres of study may include plays, essays, films, short stories, novels, poetry, creative nonfiction, and television mini-series. Writers of note include Susan Sontag, Audre Lorde, Sharon Olds, Jodi Picoult, Oliver Sacks, and others.
    BOK: HU

The Other Wes Moore (ENGL1018, 510552)
MWF 9:05am-10:00am, Person

  • This course uses the 2015 Common Reading, Wes Moore's memoir, The Other Wes Moore, as a central text to explore memoir, identity, fate, and family, among other issues related to the book's themes. The course will be linked to events sponsored by the college and satisfies the A&S Freshman Seminar requirement.
    BOK: HU

French Film Today (FREN1042, 508778)
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, White

  • Taught in English, this course introduces freshmen to contemporary French and Francophone films. Students become familiar with some of the film studies theories that shape our understanding of the films and with the themes and cultural realities of the films. Students write very short critical analyses of five of the films, and engage in group discussion about the films. Students also write one final paper on a film of their choice.  Some of the fimmakers studied are:  Haneke, Sissako, Carax, Audiard.
    BOK: HU, DC

Mapping Climate (GEOG1065C, 507939)
TR 11:00am-12:00pm, Beck

  • Students will create maps using GIS software and aircraft and satellite data to study the causes and solutions to global climate change and explore the most cost-effective methods and the best locations to reduce global warming. This is a user friendly, hands-on course using state-of-the-art mapping tools, articles, videos and in class lectures.
    BOK: NS

Yucatan (GEOG1073, 507941)
W 2:00pm-3:20pm, South

  • "Legacies and Landscapes of Yucatan" is a freshman seminar that studies the changes in the landscape of Mexico's Yucatan peninsula over time, going back to 300 AD, focusing on the human impact on the environment through time and space. Concepts such as "environmental determinism" will be discussed. Additionally, the course provides students with an opportunity to explore and learn in a foreign setting, via a winter-break field trip to the Yucatan, where they can practice language skills, appreciate different cultures, and become aware of world problems in a third world setting. The course methodology includes field work, observation, journal writing, and interactive experiences.
    BOK: SS, DC

Geology and Paleontology (GEOL1001C, 510083)
TR 3:30pm-4:50pm, staff

  • This course, the first of a two-part sequence of freshmen seminars, is designed to give introductory students a broad understanding of basic geological principles and to introduce processes in Earth and life history that occur on the scale of millions of years. In particular, it emphasizes the geologic history -- a mixture of geological and biological concepts -- of eastern North America, a world-famous area for Paleozoic rocks and fossils. This seminar provides an overview of the tools by which Earth scientists interpret physical and life history, the depth of geologic time, and the forces that shape our planet's surface. This course incorporates a mixture of class and lab experiences designed to introduce students to the broad concepts of geology largely through field observations and laboratory exploration of data and specimens.  Students do not need special background for these classes, but should have a natural curiosity, an eagerness to learn, and a willingness to work in outdoor field situations on day-long trips. Students completing this course will be well prepared to pursue further studies in geology, paleontology, or other natural sciences.
    BOK: NS

Earth, Sea, Sky (GEOL1020, 506699)
TR 11:00am-12:20pm, Ward

  • Seen from space, Earth is a "blue planet" blanketed in an atmosphere, covered in oceans and glaciers, and dappled with vegetation. This course is an introduction to earth science through the study of its interconnected systems -- the solid earth (minerals and resources, topography, plate tectonics), the hydrosphere (oceans, glaciers, the water cycle), and the atmosphere (wind, weather, climate) -- with a focus on the interactions between these systems.  Students will use Google Earth, digital topography, and interactive simulations of the basic physics to enhance understanding of the processes that make the Earth a dynamic and exciting place to live.
    BOK: NS

Exploring Language and Culture (GRMN1000, 507716)
MWF 1:25pm-2:20pm, staff

  • This Freshman Seminar course uses readings, guest lectures from language department faculty and international campus services, and participation in international events on campus and in the community to introduce skills and concepts required for language study and intercultural competence. This course emphasizes the importance of language as component of cultural identity and develops sensitivity toward the values and norms of other cultures.
    BOK: DC

Ottoman Empire (HIST1099, 507197)
TR 3:30pm-4:50pm, Frierson

  • For over 600 years, the Ottoman Empire bridges Europe and Asia and rules over peoples of a vast array of ethnicities, religions, and languages.  From humble origins as a medieval Turkish tribe among two dozen such tribes wrangling for position in a peninsula south of the Black Sea, the Ottomans taught Europe what a gunpowder empire was, and dominated the Mediterranean basin as a naval power.  They conquered and laid the complex social, political, and legal foundations of what we now think of as the Middle East.  In this seminar, we will trace the history of the Ottomans, analyze the reasons for their successes, and assess the reasons for their collapse at the end of WWI. Our readings will include histories and literatures, and we will also analyze images, sound, and material objects from the long centuries of Ottoman rule.
    BOK: HP

How the West Began (HIST1099, 509184)
TR 9:30am-10:50am, M Hall

  • Before the American West of cowboys, railroads, and vast plains filled with herds of buffalo was America’s “First West.” In this freshman seminar, we look at the movements of Americans from settled areas occupied for generations to, through, and around the Appalachian Mountains to create new regions of American settlement. This course will follow the varied migrations of Americans old and new along rivers and overland trails to claim land and create farms, plantations, trading posts, territories, and eventually, towns, cities and states. We will study why they migrated, how they lived, and their hopes, fears, loyalties, and beliefs and those of the native and colonial communities who had come before them. We will explore the experiences of all these peoples to understand how America began its journey from collection of small diverse communities clinging to the Atlantic Coast to a continental nation and global power.
    BOK: HP

Social Media & J. in the Digital Age (JOUR1020, 507648)
MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm, Blevins

  • Social Media & Journalism will cover both the practical and theoretical aspects of social media in journalism in the digital age, including its impact on professional branding, sourcing/source attribution, the merging of journalists' personal and professional lives, as well as conversations between journalists and the public that take place on social media.  A primary theme of the course will be balancing the risks and rewards of social media.
    BOK: DC, SE

Creation Stories (JUDC1050, 503786)
MWF12:20pm-1:15pm, Brolley

  • An overview and comparison of different accounts of the creation of the universe and the origins of humankind. The course will focus on writings from the Near East, including but going beyond the standard biblical accounts, with discussions of modern religious and cultural perspectives.
    BOK: HU, DC

Drugs, Disease and the Brain (NS1053, 501180)
TR 2:00pm-3:20pm, Vilinsky

  • Psychoactive drugs and brain disease have long been both fascinating and frightening.  This introductory course will survey drugs and disease, using their effects as "natural experiments" to probe how the brain really works.  In the process, students will get an introduction to neuroscience both at the cellular/molecular and whole systems level.
    BOK: NS

Pregnancy, Birth, and Health (SOC1099, 506636)
F 12:00pm-2:50pm, Bessette

  • This Freshman Seminar integrates historical and sociological readings on women's health with community action through service learning. Consistent with the aims of Medical Humanities, students will study the historical, social, and political issues surrounding reproductive issues - namely, childbirth, pregnancy, midwifery, prematurity, pregnancy loss and infant mortality, adoption, abortion, infertility, and birth control. We will pay special attention to differences of gender, race, and class. Students will be invited to reflect on course material through in-class exercises and assignments that develop writing skills and critical thinking. In addition, in order to fulfill the service-learning component, students will work in groups to build strategies and provide evidence-based resources for local Cincinnati advocacy organizations.
    BOK: HP

Worklife/Family Conflict (WGS1050, 507275)
TR 10:10am-11:05am, Sanmiguel-Valderrama

  • This course explores the tensions between paid work in the economy and unpaid work in the family. Students will learn how social, economic, and legal structures create this conflict, while also developing practical strategies to enlarge career/family choices. Students in this course will apply concepts and methodologies from multiple disciplines in the social sciences to interrogate and analyze these issues.
    BOK: SS, SE