Berlin Program

Sights & Insights into Berlin!

Sights & Insights into Berlin!

"I had seen what looked a small island in the middle of one of the swollen rivers. For all I knew it might not have even been a river, but there was an island. An island! An island was my idea. That was what Berlin was to me. I had it, and in the nick of time, too, because not two minutes later, Professor Schade was calling my name so I could come tell him about my project." - J. A. 2002

"The Pergamon Altar is one of the most spectacular and significant finds in archaeology. It is nearly intact, which is rare after so many centuries, and protected from the elements and acid rain that plague the Acropolis. The friezes, which were intricately carved upon its creation, are just as intricate today. The totality of the remains and the excellent condition of the Pergamon Altar make it a must see for any student of classical history or aspiring archaeologists. Fortunately, either of these can go to a city like Berlin to find one of the greatest treasures of the ancient world." - S. H. 2002

Sights & Insights into Berlin!

"Yes, I was wondering what you think about all of this, about giving tours of the Jewish Quarter, how do you, a German, feel about doing this, and why do you think that it is important?"

"Well, that is a very good question. I live here in Berlin where so much has happened to the Jewish people and their culture; I feel that in learning what happened to them one can learn a tremendous amount. For instance, in learning about the non-Jews, such as the women in the "Power of Love" monument, and Otto Weidt, one can grasp the definition of a hero. These people took a stand for what they believe in and successfully overcame it. Also, in doing this tour one can only imagine, but cannot grasp the concept of what it would be like to be a Jewish person here during that time. The amount of strength and courage that they had to reserve through is not only heroic, but also admirable. I think that everyone can learn from this, and I am lucky enough to show all of you. Now, lets continue on and look at some more heroes." -MJP 2002

"The first anniversary of September 11th was very strange to experience in another country. Even stranger than that though, was that here in Berlin, a thousand miles away from New York, they were taking time out to remember our tragedy. I went that morning with my friend to try and attend the services at the protestant Cathedral. It was so crowded though we could not get in. I remembered someone telling me that if I showed my American passport they were letting Americans in to the Dom. This was not true; however, I tried and a man next to me said, "Do you think that you are better than me because you have an American passport". After speaking with him, I realized that even in a time of remembrance and unity there are still many Germans and others all over the world that feel a great animosity towards America: The day continued and I walked down by the U. S. embassy. There I found people in quite voice debating the U. S. stance on Iraq in the midst of candles, flowers and letters of condolence that had been tied to the fence in front of the American embassy. People I ran into that day who could tell I was American, told me how sorry they were for what had happened and gave an outpouring of support. However, the thought of that one man did not leave me. I could not let it." -C.M. 2002

Berlin Program

"My impression of Berlin is one of a cosmopolitan city looking to tomorrow with the charm of yesterday still present. Just everywhere you look there are so many fine examples of the old architecture still present throughout Berlin, and the Berliners have taken a long look at the historical and sentimental values of their classical buildings and are reconnecting to the past. I experienced a great respect for these buildings I was so privileged to see, and I will always remember fondly my visit to Berlin." -S. K. 2002

"After going on this trip, my main priority is to get back to Germany, travel to other cities and, of course, go back to Berlin. My heart is still floating in the river near the Lustgarten and is loudly calling my name." -M. F. 2002

Berlin Program

"There, situated within moments of all Alexander Blatz's modernity was the thirteenth century St. Marienkirche and many amazing copper fountains. I was first overwhelmed by the church's mass and beauty but additionally taken back by its placement in the city. At that point I was becoming aware of the fact that I was in a city unlike no other that I had visited before." - B.U., Sept. 2001

"By the way of example, the stories, pictures, sounds and sites of different exhibitions and otherwise have profoundly touched me. Is that the same effect an exhibition would have on a German student who has been presented with this idea of guilt of their parents and grandparents, all his life? It is hard to say. One thing is true, however, I personally never felt unwanted or unwelcome during our stay. I fell in love with Berlin and Germany." -A. G., Sept., 2001

Berlin Program

"This Jewish Museum was built in a city that was transformed form being the Nazi capital of the country, to a city of remembrance. The Jewish Museum Berlin in an amazing experience, one that I will never forget." -M. S., Sept., 2001

"There was also a pro-America rally at the Brandenburg Gate where the German government denounced the terrorist acts and declared their support for America. It was an absolute sea of people. There were American flags waving, high officials speaking, and a sign on the Brandenburg Gate that read, 'Wir trauern -- Our deepest sympathy.'" -C. S., Sept., 2001

Berlin Program