Course Listings

1000-Level Expand

15GEOG1001. Introduction to Physical Geography I. 3 ug. cr. This survey course provides a broad introduction to physical geography. Students can expect to understand earth-sun relations and the connection to seasons, components of weather such as temperature and precipitation, and spatial patterns of global climate. General climate zones have a strong impact on landscape and soil development, and on distribution of plants and animals as major biomes. The interplay between atmospheric, geologic and biological processes occurs at the earth surface, and yields characteristic landscapes, biomes and soils in arid, coastal, and glacial regions. The dynamics of ecosystems will be examined in the context of human impact and global changes. This course fulfills the requirement of Social & Ethical Issues and Natural Sciences. BoK: SE, NS.

15GEOG1004. Introduction to Human Geography. 3 ug. Cr. FGeography 1004 will introduce students to areas of inquiry within human geography: the spatial variation of human phenomena that include population, culture, ethnicity, language, religion, economics and urban form are explored and analyzed. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG105. Introduction to Human Geography in Action. 3 ug. Cr. GEOG 1005 will introduce students to applications, models, processes and research methods connected with studying human geographic phenomena. Students will explore diffusion processes, map interpretation, field observations, development, regional economic activity, segregation and integration, and human impact on the environment, all through a spatial context. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG1011. Weather, Climate, and the Biosphere. 3 ug. Cr. Fundamentals of atmospheric processes including solar radiant energy, the role of earth-sun relations on seasons, temperature, cloud formation and precipitation, air pressure and winds, air masses and storms, and weather forecasting. These building blocks will be used to explain the global patterns of atmospheric circulation, the distribution of global climate zones, the human impact on atmospheric chemistry and natural processes, and mechanisms of climate change. The nature of the biosphere and plant systems is discussed, as well as their evolution and developmental processes. The role of climate and biogeochemical factors on ecosystems and biomes are investigated. Throughout the course, the human impact is emphasized and remedial solutions discussed. Required of majors. This course fulfills the requirement of Social & Ethical Issues and Natural Sciences. BoK: SE, NE.

15GEOG1011L. Weather, Climate and the Biosphere: Laboratory. 1 ug. Cr. This course is offered in association with the Introduction to Physical Geography 1011 course, Weather, Climate and the Biosphere. Students enrolled in this course must be currently enrolled in (or have previously taken) the lecture course. It is designed to elucidate concepts presented in lecture, in the belief that a "hands-on" lab experience enhances understanding and insight. The weekly graded labs emphasize critical thinking; this is achieved primarily through creation and analysis of graphs and maps, as well as observations through simulation and field studies. This course fulfills the requirement of Natural Sciences. BoK: NS.

15GEOG1012. Earth's Dynamic Surface: Landforms and Soils. 3 ug. Cr. This course provides a broad introduction to the Earth's landforms, its soils, and the processes that form them. A systems approach is used to link process and landscapes and soilscapes. Included in the course are discussions of tectonic movements such as subduction (crustal destruction) and orogeny (mountain building), mass movements such as landslides and surface creep, the hydrologic cycle and water balances, fluvial (running water) systems and flood behavior, coastal erosion and movement, glacial processes, and soil development and differentiation. The surface features of the earth, its landforms and its soils are inherently visual subjects. Landforms often offer striking evidence of the processes that created them and the transformative processes that may still be at work. Processes that give new height to portions of the earth's surface are clearly visible in many parts of the world as volcanic vents and sharply upthrust masses of rock. Any area of land that is exposed to the atmosphere or ocean is immediately subject to a variety of weathering and erosional processes that act to tear it down. Earth's surface materials are further transformed by a host of climate-related physical, chemical, and biological processes. . This course fulfills the requirement of Social & Ethical Issues and Natural Sciences. BoK: SE, NS.

15GEOG1012L. Earth's Dynamic Surface: Landforms and Soils Laboratory. 1 ug. Cr. This course is offered in association with the Introduction to Physical Geography 1012 course, Earth's Dynamic Surface: Landforms and Soils. Students enrolled in this course must be currently enrolled (or have previously taken) the lecture course). It is designed to elucidate concepts presented in lecture, in the belief that a "hands-on" lab experience enhances understanding and insight. The weekly graded labs emphasize critical thinking; this is achieved primarily through creation and analysis of graphs and maps, as well as observations through field studies. Lab assignments concentrate on improving visual skills since much geomorphological and soil data are presented in graphical or mapped form; landforms and soils vary and change over both space and time. This course fulfills the requirement of Natural Sciences. BoK: NS.

15GEOG1030. Great Earth Debates. 3 ug. Cr. This course focuses on important, current and ongoing controversies facing people and on our dependence on the natural environment for maintaining and improving our quality of life. Topics range from philosophical to practical issues including: sustainable development; complex systems; the precautionary principle; ecological services; environmental justice; assessments of risk; alternative energy; global climate change; safe and dependable food supplies; toxic chemicals; accessibility to clean air, water and soil; and remediation and restoration technologies. This course fulfills the requirement of Social & Ethical Issues. BoK: SE.

15GEOG1036. Until the Last Drop: Water Issues From Science to Policy. 3 ug. Cr. We explore the water molecule and its unique properties that make water so essential to life and make Earth a habitable planet. We progress to an examination of the cosmogenic origins of water and the history of water on earth. The circulation of water in the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans are explored. The human exploitation, distribution, and treatment of water are examined both in a historical and current context. We explore the inextricable relationship between water, energy, and the carbon and nutrient cycles. We conclude with an examination of the global distribution of water and its present impact on both world and national politics. This course fulfills the requirement of Natural Sciences. BoK: NS.

15GEOG1040. Earth from Space. 3 ug. Cr. This course introduces basic concepts and principles of satellite remote sensing, Global Positioning System (GPS), and Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Earth Observations, with applications to space technology, weather forecasting, hurricane tracking, ocean observation, terrestrial topography, etc. Includes hands-on tutorials and training in using Google Earth, Virtual Earth, Google Map, GPS Receiver & Navigator, USGS and NASA satellite data search engines, and on-line satellite image viewer. This course fulfills the requirement of Technology and Innovation and Natural Sciences. BoK: TI, NS.

15GEOG1059. Exploring the Solar System. 3 ug. Cr. Journey through the splendor and diversity of the Solar System from the perspective of manned and robotic space missions. The course will examine humankind's motivation for space exploration and the history of space exploration, the results of space missions, and their importance to the future of our civilization. This course fulfills the requirement of Social & Ethical Issues and Natural Sciences. BoK: SE, NS.

15GEOG1065C. Mapping Climate Change and its Solutions with GIS, Aircraft and Satellites. 3 ug. Cr. Students will create maps using GIS software and aircraft and satellite data to study the causes and solutions to global climate change and explore the most cost-effective methods and the best locations to reduce global warming. This is a user friendly, hands-on course using state-of-the-art mapping tools, articles, videos and in class lectures. This course fulfills the requirement of Natural Sciences. BoK: NS.

15GEOG1073. FLegacies and Landscapes of Yucatan. 3 ug. Cr. "Legacies and Landscapes of Yucatan" is a freshman seminar that studies the changes in the landscape of Mexico's Yucatan peninsula over time, going back to 300 AD, focusing on the human impact on the environment through time and space. Concepts such as "environmental determinism" will be discussed. Additionally, the course provides students with an opportunity to explore and learn in a foreign setting, via a winter-break field trip to the Yucatan, where they can practice language skills, appreciate different cultures, and become aware of world problems in a third world setting. The course methodology includes field work, observation, journal writing, and interactive experiences. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG1080. Freshman Seminar: World of Maps. 3 ug. Cr. This course focuses on map reading, use and appreciation, and is relevant to all students. The historical purpose and utility of maps is explored, but the focus will be on interpreting modern maps and images. Students will use modern mapping techniques in the form of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software, Global Positioning System (GPS) and processing of remotely sensed images from satellites and aircraft. Activities include accessing and displaying electronic maps and satellite images using map repositories and Google Earth. Discussions will be supplemented by in-class mapping and interpretation exercises. This course fulfills the requirement of Technology and Innovation. BoK: TI.

2000-Level Expand

15GEOG2003. Greater Cincinnati Regional Geography. 3 ug. Cr. This course examines the Greater Cincinnati area through both regional approaches that focus on today's dynamic geography of this area, and through systematic analyses of physical, economic, cultural and sociological patterns and processes particular to this region. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2004. Geography of Ohio. 3 ug. Cr. Survey of the physical geography of Ohio and how it shapes and is shaped by human activities. It includes a geographic analysis of Ohio's place in the domestic and global economy. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2011. Geography of Latin America. 3 ug. Cr. Geography of Latin America is a study of the regional geography of Latin America. There are two course foci. The first is thematic, a topical study that provides a basic understanding of important underlying themes: an introduction to the history of the region, physical geography, population growth and ethnicity, urbanization, and the changing structure of the Latin American economy- agricultural systems, industrialization, tourism and the informal sector. The second focus is an in-depth regional analysis of Latin America: Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, northern and southern Andean nations. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2016. Geography of Europe. 3 ug. Cr. This course is designed to acquaint students with the changing geographies of Europe. It presents an interdisciplinary, systematic and regional investigation of the physical and cultural processes and phenomena that have created the characteristic landscapes of Europe, including unifying characteristics, population problems, political and economic diversity, and sources of regional conflict. This course explores historical and contemporary issues affecting Europe, including climate, landform regions, trade, transportation, urban growth, population change, culture change, and evolution of economic integration in the region. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on human-environment interaction in Europe, and by the end of the course students will become familiar with the diverse natural and human environments of each sub-region of Europe as well as their interconnectedness. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2020C. The Human Impact on the Natural Environment. 4 ug. Cr. This course uses a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine the impact of human activity on various components of the natural world including vegetation, soils, water, the landscape and climate. Remedial and sustaining strategies for especially sensitive geographic environments are examined. Lectures will be supplemented by in-class lab exercises that use remote sensing and computer mapping technology (GIS) to explore regional and global patterns of disruption. The emphasis will be on developing an understanding of key concepts and issues, and on encouraging critical thinking about human-created problems and solutions. This course presupposes the Intro Environmental Science sequence (1011 and 1012) or equivalent. This course fulfills the requirement of Natural Sciences. BoK: NS.

15GEOG2023. The Geography of NAFTA Nations. 3 ug. Cr. An overview of the regional geography of the United States, Canada, and Mexico - the NAFTA nations. There are two overarching course foci. The first is thematic, a topical approach to an understanding of regional diversity. Themes include physical geography, population and ethnic trends, urban places, economic geography - agricultural and industrial regions, new industrial places, and the post-industrial economy. The second focus is an in-depth analysis of the regional geography of the NAFTA nations; east coast megalopolis to the ecotopia of California, Mexico's industrialized border to the barren north. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2025. The Geography of Africa. 3 ug. Cr. Covers the African countries south of the Sahara. The starting point of the course is the enigma that, despite ample resources, Africa still has not developed economically as a continent. Specific topics covered include traditional agricultural systems and the problems in modernizing them, sources of population pressures on resources and environment, urbanization, the role of government policy in exacerbating climate change, the relationship between ethnic conflicts and political instability, supranationalism and devolution, the lag in industrialization and international trade, and the impact of globalization on African societies. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2026. Geography of Asia. 3 ug. Cr. Interdisciplinary exploration of the region stretching from Turkey to Japan, including unifying characteristics, population problems, political and legal diversity, sources of ethnic and religion conflict, the variety of climate types, the impact of climate change on hydrology and landscape, which model of economic development best suits Asian needs, the impacts of imperialism and globalization, and trade balances with the United States. This course fulfills the requirement of Social Scienecs. BoK: SS.

15GEOG2031. Geography of the Middle East. 3 ug. Cr. Survey of geographic research dealing with long term problems of the Middle East [Maghreb to Iran] including regional definition and identification; ethnic and religious diversity and conflict; boundary disputes; disagreements over best use of scarce resources such as water and petroleum; population growth, structure and distribution; choices of development models; the role of international and intra-regional trade; and the impact of climate change on agriculture. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2036. Geography of Southern Asia. 3 ug. Cr. This course explores the physical and cultural geography of Southern Asia including its landforms, strategic importance, distribution of languages and religions, historical and current conflicts, types of government, and their influence on the current contrasting rates of economic development the region. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2037. Geography of China. 3 ug. Cr. Examination of the changing geographies of China, with a systematic analysis of the patterns and processes of physical and human phenomena. Topics include physical environment and resources, population, diverse cities and regions, government policies, modernization, industrialization, urbanization, and integration into the global economy. This course fulfills the requirement of Diversity & Culture and Social Scienecs. BoK: DC, SS.

15GEOG2043. Conservation Biogeography. 3 ug. Cr. This course explores the role of geography in the conservation of species diversity, focusing on the theories and practical methods involved in addressing the global problem of biodiversity loss. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG2061. People and Environment I: Population and World Hunger. 3 ug. Cr. This course articulates a global perspective on the dynamic interactions between the natural environment and human population. Geographic approaches to the interdisciplinary study of the human population-environment relationship including consideration of ecosystem and population dynamics, and the complexity in food production are examined. The emphasis will be on developing an understanding of key concepts and issues, applying this knowledge in the context of case studies from developed and developing countries, and on encouraging critical thinking about environmental problems and solutions. This course fulfills the requirement of Social & Ethical Issues and Natural Sciences. BoK: SE, NS.

15GEOG2062. People and Environment II: Water, Energy, and Resources. 3 ug. Cr. This course provides a geographic approach to the study of the earth's natural capital: energy, water, air, fossil fuels and mineral resources. The emphasis will be on case studies from developed and developing countries and on encouraging critical thinking about environmental problems and solutions. Students will explore the formative processes, the unequal spatial distribution and extraction limitations of resources, the concept of sustainable use of natural resources, and how resources can be used more sustainably. This course fulfills the requirement of Social & Ethical Issues and Natural Sciences. BoK: SE, NS.

3000-Level Expand

15GEOG3031. Elements of Climatology. 3 ug. Cr. In-depth examination of atmospheric processes including solar radiant energy, the role of earth-sun relations on seasons, temperature, cloud formation and precipitation, air pressure and winds, air masses and storms, and weather forecasting. These fundamentals will be used to explain the global patterns of atmospheric circulation, the distribution of global climate zones, the human impact on atmospheric chemistry and natural processes, and mechanisms of climate change. Throughout the course, the human impact is emphasized and remedial solutions discussed. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3032. Landscapes and Landforms. 3 ug. Cr. Atmospheric and geologic processes involved in the formation of landscapes and landforms over time. Emphasis is on global patterns and formative processes, but the increasing impact of humans is examined as well. Presupposes some background in earth sciences. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3033. Advanced Environmental Geography. In depth examination of global environmental challenges, environmental planning to combat pollution problems, as well as the complexity in environmental data collection and analyses. These fundamentals will be used for modeling and assessing the anthropogenic impacts on the environment. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3035. AResource Conservation. 3 ug. Cr. Dealing with environmental issues and areas of interaction among natural resources, population, energy, technology, societal institutions and cultural values. Are the earth's resources on the verge of exhaustion? Discussion of the sustainability of human society and the biosphere. Innovative avoidance of resource crises. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3039. Geography of Religion. 3 ug. Cr. It is a specialized course within human and cultural geography that focuses on the spatial distribution and variation of religion and religious phenomena across space. Characteristics and physical objects of religions are examined, as well as condensed histories, so that students may fully appreciate their diffusion, cultural impact, locations and influences on present-day societies and landscapes. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3041. Economic Geography. 3 ug. Cr. Economic geography is an analysis of economic systems and spatial patterns of production and consumption. Course organization focuses on sectors of the economy: primary sector-agricultural patterns; secondary sector-industrial location; and tertiary/quaternary activities-retailing and the public sector; with emphasis on spatial processes, location models, regional economic development, and the changing economic landscape. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3044. Consumption, Culture and Society. 3 ug. Cr. Consumption, Culture and Society is designed to provide a theoretical analysis of the geographies of consumption and to explore the development and construction of consumption spaces. Spatial analysis will include an emphasis on commodity production and consumption, class-based consumer cultures, mass consumption and commodification, and the production- to consumption-based transitions of global and local societies. The course also examines how world products have impacted American patterns of consumption, and how American consumption has also influenced consumption processes elsewhere, and how the relationship between society/culture and consumption can impact and influence each other. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3047. Political Geography. 3 ug. Cr. This course examines the importance of space and place in political processes operating at a variety of geographical scales--from the local to the global -- and explores the role of geography in the formation of political parties, social movements, political identities, and other forms of political alliances. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3050. The Crowded Greenhouse: Human Populations and Climate Change. 3 ug. Cr. This seminar-style course explores the interactions between our growing population and the planet's rapidly changing environment, investigating human-environment interactions in various regions of the world, with emphasis on evaluating the impact of climate change on the developing world and creating solutions for a sustainable future. The course will include virtual or in-person guest visits from climate scientists working in the Arctic and an Inupiat Eskimo from Barrow Alaska, visits to labs on campus where climate research is going on today, and work with researchers in analyzing data. Because this topic includes current events and politically charged issues, there will be considerable opportunity for students to discuss and respond to readings, and to introduce their own topics of interest. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3059. Landforms across the Solar System. 3 ug. Cr. This course in comparative planetology will discuss the similarities and differences between landforms on different planets. The question why the planets look so different will be answered by examining processes (tectonics, volcanism, surface processes) which act on the bodies in the Solar System. Understanding these processes helps us understand how the planets formed and changed over time. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3060. Cities. This course uses a systematic analysis of urban social, cultural, economic, and political activities to understand the evolutionary developments of spatial structures within urban areas. In additional the geographic locations of cities and the rise and fall of their "importance" will be analyzed. The economic, institutional, and political forces that shape urban systems will be emphasized. This course is intended to be a "foundation" course.

15GEOG3090. Map Reading and Interpretation. 3 ug. Cr. Geography 3090 explores the geographer's tool of the map: how maps are used to graphically represent our surroundings, our research findings and data of interest that we collect. In this course, students will learn about different types of maps, map elements and projections, symbology and cartographic conventions, and learn how to plot different types of data and how to recognize and analyze spatial patterns and other types of geographic information represented on maps. This course fulfills the requirement of Technology and Innovation. BoK: TI.

4000-Level Expand

15GEOG4048. Political Geography: Geopolitics. 3 ug. Cr. This course focuses on the international and cross-national perspectives of political geography. It examines the political, economic, and social aspects of international relations from a geographical perspective and examines societies in transition in the post Cold War and post 9-11 world theatre.

15GEOG4049. Political Geography: Elections. 3 ug. Cr. Electoral geography attempts to understand the regularities and irregularities of spatial patterns depicting voting results on a map. This course will focus on the study of the geography of elections as the practical manifestation of political behavior in a democratic society. As such this course will consider economic, social, cultural, and demographic variation across space and time and how it affects voting behavior.

15GEOG4061. Globalization and Cities. 3 ug. Cr. This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the geographies of globally dominant cities and how various societies and cultures shape and influence these cities in disparate ways. Additionally students will gain an appreciation of global economic, cultural, political, and social pressures and their influence on the world's urban system.

15GEOG4062. Sustainable Cities. 3 ug. Cr. The current global urban system institutionalized by urban restructuring beginning at the turn of the twentieth century and intensified at the turn of the twenty-first century has significantly contributed to the growth of poverty, inequality, low levels of community participation, and environmental degradation within cities. Many scholars question the long-term sustainability of the urban form this system has developed and is continuing to develop. This course examines the theoretical underpinnings of policy formation in response to the issues and questions surrounding the present form of cities and their sustainability.

5000-Level Expand

15GEOG5000. Geography Capstone I. 2 ug. Cr. The first half of the department's capstone requirement [which is completed by taking GEOG 5007 or GEOG5008]. Covers the fundamentals of research in geography and presents information on how to begin a job search or apply to graduate school.

15GEOG5007. Geography Capstone II: Portfolio. 2 ug. Cr. Geography (5007) is designed to provide students with a with a two-part capstone experience consisting of a field experience and a short research paper. These elements, together with an updated resume, comprise the portfolio of the title. The focus of the paper is a research question that encompasses a hypothesis, data collection and analysis, map, discussion and results. The field experience provides students with an opportunity to learn beyond the classroom setting and gain hand-on experience. The field experience can be satisfied by three ways: attendance at a national or regional professional geography meeting, supervised field work with a professor, or participation in a field trip. The field experience must conclude with a journal and reference selected readings.

15GEOG5008. Geography Capstone II: Senior Research Project. 2 ug. Cr. Supervised completion of a research project to fulfill second half of department's capstone requirement (the first half is GEOG5000). The completed research project is either presented at local, regional, or national professional meeting or submitted as a formal written document (senior thesis).

15GEOG5009. History and Philosophy of Geography. 3 ug. Cr. History and Philosophy of Geography explores the different bodies of thought which have shaped the character of Anglo-American geography and, to some extent, social science, from the Renaissance to the present. This exploration crosses the traditional subdisciplinary divisions of human geography, physical geography and GIScience, examining the ways in which all three have been woven together and pulled apart by broad intellectual trends in the discipline, and by which the similarities and differences among contemporary geographic subfields and social sciences are contingent, historical products.

15GEOG5079. Human Geography Research Methods. 3 ug. Cr. This course is designed to give an overview of the methodologies employed by contemporary human geographers. The course will provide an introduction to debates surrounding the analysis and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data. Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of these methods.

6000-Level Expand

15GEOG6001. Field Projects in Geography. 1-6 ug. or gr. Cr. Off-campus field project undertaken on an individual basis and arranged with a faculty supervisor prior to, or at the beginning of the term.

15GEOG6002. Problems in Geography. 1-15 ug. or gr. Cr. Fall Semester. Individual research projects requiring prior faculty approval. Credit and hours to be arranged. May be taken more than once.

15GEOG6003. Problems in Geography. 1-15 ug. or gr. Cr. Spring Semester. Individual research projects requiring prior faculty approval. Credit and hours to be arranged. May be taken more than once.

15GEOG6005. Internship in Geography. 1- 15 ug. or gr. Cr. Fall Semester. An Internship in Geography is an effective and valuable way to gain on-the-job experience. The class will help students build resume, provide contacts to employers, and determine what to do after graduating.

15GEOG6006. Internship in Geography. 1- 15 ug. or gr. Cr. Spring Semester. An Internship in Geography is an effective and valuable way to gain on-the-job experience. The class will help students build resume, provide contacts to employers, and determine what to do after graduating.

15GEOG6010. Non-Western History and Philosophy of Geography. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Non-Western History and Philosophy of Geography explores how the world, excluding Anglo-America, has approached geography, and, to some extent, social science, through both historical and philosophical contexts. This exploration examines how Eastern, Islamic and other philosophies have informed the discipline of geography, and what similarities and differences from Anglo-American perspectives exist in geographical history, geographic research and in defining geography.

15GEOG6021. Crime Mapping and Analysis. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Introduction of crime databases, crime mapping and spatial analysis of crime in a GIS environment.

15GEOG6031. GIS and Public Health. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course introduces geographic information sciences (GIS), public health, and the application of GIS to public health. It covers the processing, geocoding, mapping and analysis of public health data in a GIS environment. It highlights the latest spatial-temporal models dealing with public health related problems.

15GEOG6037. Geolinguistics and the Geography of Language. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Geolinguistics and the Geography of Language is a specialized course within human and cultural geography that explores spatial variations of linguistic phenomena and languages. The course will delve into spatial variations of phonology, dialectology, morphology, and phonetics, and will also explore categorizations, origins and diffusion of and languages. In addition, the course will explore the importance and role of language as an element of culture.

15GEOG6039. Geography of Religion and Belief Systems. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. The Geography of Religion and Belief Systems is a specialized course within human and cultural geography that focuses on the spatial distribution and variation of religion, belief systems and sacred phenomena across space. Characteristics of religions are examined, as well as condensed histories, so that students may fully appreciate their diffusion, cultural impact, locations and influences on present-day societies and landscapes. Explorations of the spatial characteristics of religions are conducted across local and global scales.

15GEOG6040. Geography of Ethnicity. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course examines spatial dimensions of ethnicity, exploring the theoretical concepts concerning the meaning of ethnicity, and specific geographic dimensions of ethnic enclaves, acculturation, assimilation, and irredentism. Classic and contemporary measurements and models of ethnicity, integration and segregation are also explored and critically examined. The course is arranged to examine ethnic components in both historical and systematic contexts, and also identifies ethnic imprints on the cultural landscape.

15GEOG6041. Contemporary Issues in Economic Geography. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Geography 6041 is an upper-division seminar-style course for both undergraduates and graduate students that focuses on contemporary topics within economic geography, centered on economic systems, consumption and globalization, and on the geographic component of economic concerns and issues affecting the U.S. and the world. The exploration of spatial analysis into these contemporary economic problems illuminates potential solutions to them, whereby theoretical and conceptual issues are presented globally, and practicalities are then explored regionally and locally.

15GEOG6044. Geographical Dimensions of Consumption and Consumerism. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course examines the spatial economic processes, diversity and scale of consumption, consumerism and commodity culture, and the way in which these processes involve space, place and landscape. "Consumption" can be conceptualized in a number of ways, and the course examines those various meanings and also how consumption is a nexus between individuals, objects and society. The course also examines, through both theoretical and empirical contexts, how these interactions are enmeshed in political, cultural and economic processes.

15GEOG6049. Geography of Wine. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a broad introduction to the geography of wine. Wine is an inherently geographic subject. Both viticulture (the growing of grapes) and viniculture (the production of wine) are intimately linked to the environment and to cultural, economic, and political attributes of the places where wine is made. The geography of wine is a story of historical diffusion thousands of years in the making. That history has resulted in a mosaic of wine-making traditions and places, some hundreds of years old and others in their infancy. These subjects will be covered through lecture and readings, both of which will be tested on in mid-tem and final exams. Students will also produce a research paper. Small amounts of wine will be available for sampling during some classes. Students must provide proof of age and sign a legal waiver to participate in the course.

15GEOG6050. International Field Trips. 1-5 ug. or gr. Cr. Geography International Field Trips provides students with an opportunity to explore and learn in a foreign setting. Field trips vary depending upon the location, and course objectives vary depending upon the educational scope of the foreign experience. In general educational objectives encompass an exposure to and appreciation of different cultures, awareness of world problems-particularly in 3rd world settings, an opportunity to practice language skills, and stimulation of student interest of different subject areas.

15GEOG6051. Urban Habitat. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. In-depth examination of the physical environment of cities and urban environmental problems. Emphasis is on the impacts of urbanization on the city environment and the effectiveness of various urban management strategies.

15GEOG6054. Soils. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This is an "advanced introductory" course in soils geography. There is no official prerequisite for the course, however, students are expected to have the equivalent of an introductory course in physical geography as background knowledge. It is a soils geography course, that is, there will be a focus on the factors determining spatial variability in pedogenesis and development, as well as a focus on soils as a factor in human settlement and land use. Field trips are a mandatory part of the course.

15GEOG6055. Approaches to Past Landscapes. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a broad introduction to the concepts and methods of geoarchaeology, environmental archaeology, and pedoarchaeology. A strong emphasis will be given to the analytical reconstruction of former landscapes as an essential part of understanding past human interactions with the natural environment. Readings and class discussions focus on case studies from many parts of the world. When possible, the course will include a field trip or trips to local excavations or constructions projects with a geoarchaeological component.

15GEOG6056. Geoarchaeology Fieldwork: Latin America. 1-6 ug. or gr. Cr. This course teaches students geoarchaeological and paleoenvironmental field methods in the pursuit of archaeological research in a variety of Latin American countries, most typically Belize, Mexico, and Guatemala. While the specific methods used vary depending on individual project goals, techniques typically include topographic and vegetation mapping, soil and sediment profiling, and lake coring.

15GEOG6057. Field Work, Instrumentation, and Research Methods. 1-4 ug. or gr. Cr. This is an experiential course that promotes hands-on information assimilation and analysis. Focus on field data collection methods with emphasis on automated monitoring of environmental variables and survey methods to gather social/cultural information. Data collection strategies and methodologies evaluated within framework of specific research goals to ensure that spatial and temporal scales are appropriate to the problem. Data analysis and display conducted using real data sets. Standard cartographic and statistical software packages applied to analyze patterns and trends. Assigned methodology articles, acquiring varied data sources, and building databases define the learning core, and are discussed in a group setting. Specific topics may vary each semester.

15GEOG6060. Urban Development. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course examines the spatial evolution of the American urban system from the late 1700s through the present. Emphasis is placed on the changing spatial organization of economic activities and how developments in economic structure, transportation, politics, and communications have affected urban areas.

15GEOG6061. Global Cities. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the geographies of world cities and globalization and how various societies shape and influence cities in disparate ways.

15GEOG6062. Urban Sustainability. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. The current urban system institutionalized by urban restructuring at the turn of the twenty-first century has significantly contributed to intensification of poverty, inequality, poor levels of community participation, and environmental degradation. This class examines the theoretical underpinnings and policy formation of, and responses to, the issues surrounding sustainable communities.

15GEOG6063. Urban Problems. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. What is urban? What is an urban problem? Who decides? Who cares? Why? Do we live in a period of "Urbicide"? The answers to any of these questions are not as easy to determine as you might expect. This course will explore and attempt to understand the underlying political, geographic, social, and economic factors that contribute to the development and continuance of conditions that are considered to be urban problems.

15GEOG6064. Geography of the Inner City. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Inner cities cannot be understood in isolation as they are products of economic and social change, race relations, and public policy. This course examines how cities are affected by the changing geography of the world economy, the geography of economic restructuring as it affects inner cities, public policies affecting incomes and jobs in inner cities, the rolls of economic restructuring and racial segregation in the creation of an inner city underclass, gentrification, and some public policies that could address many of these issues.

15GEOG6069. Niehoff Seminar. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This cross-college and interdisciplinary seminar meets at the Niehoff Urban Design Studio. The topics vary each semester the course is available.

15GEOG6071C. Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Introduction of the theories and applications of Geographic Information Sciences (GIS). The basic topics include definition of GIS, the history of GIS, topological data structure, data preprocessing, data manipulation and analysis, geographic modeling with GIS, and the future of GIS. The focus of this course is spatial analysis.

15GEOG6074. Computer Analytical Cartography. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. The art and science of making maps using ArcGIS software. Emphasis on applying cartographic principles and creating professional maps, with focus on thematic, choropleth and isarithmic mapping. Tutorials and lab exercises are designed to provide the student with a practical working knowledge base.

15GEOG6075C. Quantitative Geography and Spatial Statistics I. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. GEOG 6075 is the first of a three-sequence series designed to acquaint students with methods employed in geographic research. Primarily data-driven and analytic in nature, the course introduces students to spatial analysis and visualization, reinforces their knowledge of mathematics and statistical procedures, and develops their ability to understand, apply and interpret quantitative processes to solve geographic research problems. GEOG 6075 is a course on applied statistics (rather than theoretical or mathematical). The emphasis, therefore, rests upon learning and understanding various statistical procedures, assumptions and types of data necessary for using specified methods, and exploring how they have aided geographers in answering research questions. Students will become familiar with statistical packages and with statistical capabilities in other software. This course is designed to fit the needs of both advanced undergraduate majors and graduate students. Graduate students and undergraduates are evaluated separately.

15GEOG6076C. Principles of Remote Sensing. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. The fundamental objective of this course is to explore basic physical principles of electromagnetic radiation; remote sensing systems; interpretation of satellite images, thermal and radar imagery; digital image analysis of multispectral satellite data, and remote sensing applications.There are two classes each week. Each class will focus on a lecture topic, a laboratory exercise, or a combination of both. ENVI, a robust remote sensing image processing package will be used for all labs. Lecture topics include Introduction to Remote Sensing; Electromagnetic Spectrum and Energy Interaction; Elements of Remote Sensing Images; Satellites and Sensors; Radiometric and Geometric Correction; Image enhancements, Transformations, Classifications; Classification Accuracy; Radar Remote Sensing; Urban and Geologic Remote Sensing; Vegetation and Water Remote Sensing. Laboratory exercises include: Introduction to ENVI image processing software;Image Searching and Acquisition; Image Georeferencing; Image Filters; Supervised Classification; Unsupervised Classification; and Creating Image Maps.

15GEOG6079C. Qualitative Methods in Geography. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course is designed to give an overview of qualitative methods used in contemporary geographic research. The course goals are the following: to give an overview of qualitative methods, so that the insights gained from qualitative investigation may be appreciated and understood; to explore the methodological approaches and various qualitative techniques employed by geographers; and to address a variety of tools used in qualitative research. This course is designed to fit the needs of both advanced undergraduate majors and graduate students. Graduate students and undergraduates are evaluated separately.

15GEOG6080. Field Work and Research Methods. 1-15 ug. or gr. Cr. This course is designed to give students the opportunity to design and conduct field work. Students will enter the course with a research question and a embryonic conception of research methodology and/or design. They will refine their methodology and conduct independent research.

15GEOG6081C. Intermediate GIS. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course focuses on GIS modeling and its applications to urban, economic and environmental issues. It further applies GIS theories and techniques to real-world problems. It is designed to provide a background in advanced GIS analysis programs such as Spatial Analyst, Geostatistical Analyst, and Network Analyst to develop an understanding of the operational basis of modern GIS technology.

15GEOG6082C. Natural Hazards. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course introduces the causes, physical characteristics, spatial patterns, and impacts of natural hazards and disasters and examines geo-spatial technologies for prediction, assessment and management of natural hazards. It combines lectures with homework assignments. The lectures cover earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, hurricanes, coastal erosions, droughts, floods, and wildfires. This course examines the causes, underlying earth processes, and spatial patterns of natural hazards, and discusses and practices the methodologies and technologies used to analyze the magnitude and frequency of natural hazards, and institutional and societal response and decision-making processes in risk reduction and avoidance.

15GEOG6085C. Quantitative Geography and Spatial Statistics II. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course explores advanced statistical models as these are used in research. GEOG 6085 is the second of a three-sequence series designed to acquaint students with methods employed in geographic research. The course will cover intermediate techniques in statistics, spatial analysis and model building, and further develops students' understanding and application of quantitative processes to solve geographic research problems. Students will continue to develop their skills with statistical packages and with statistical capabilities in other software. GEOG 6085 is designed to allow in-depth focus on current problems/issues that geographers will encounter in their professional practice and in their research. This course is designed to fit the needs of both advanced undergraduate majors and graduate students. Graduate students and undergraduates are evaluated separately.

15GEOG6086C. Intermediate Remote Sensing. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. The fundamental objective of this course is to explore advanced techniques for processing remote sensing data. A wide range of topics will be covered including principal components analysis and data transformations, advanced classification techniques, hyperspectral analysis, advanced spectral techniques, subpixel analysis, neural networks, segmentation and object oriented classification, and advanced change detection methods. There are two classes each week. Each class will focus on a lecture topic, a laboratory exercise, or a combination of both. ENVI will be used as the primary software package in the laboratory exercises.

15GEOG6087C. Hyperspectral and Thermal Remote Sensing for Environmental Applications. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Lecture will emphasize practical applications of remote sensing and GIS to the environment. Laboratory will use state-of-the-art software and near-real time and historic hyper-spectral and thermal imagery from aircraft and satellites applied to current environmental problems.

15GEOG6089C. Digital terrain and watershed analysis. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course covers concepts, numerical algorithms, and techniques for terrain and watershed analysis. It combines lectures with a substantial practical component developed through lab work. The lectures cover spatial representation of topography, topographical data acquisition techniques, terrain visualization, terrain parameter derivation, extraction of critical terrain features, landform recognition and classification, viewshed analysis, cut-and-fill and volumetric analysis, drainage network extraction, watershed delineation, and distributed watershed models.

15GEOG6091C. Advanced GIS & Web GIS. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course addresses the application of advanced GIS techniques to research and real-world problems. This course is designed [1] to introduce students the basic structure and capabilities of object-oriented programming in a GIS environment, and [2] to introduce current Internet Mapping and Web GIS. Students will learn how to automate GIS operations and customize the user interface using the programming language available in ArcGIS. It is also designed to provide database management skill in MS Access and MS SQL. This course is designed to introduce the basic structure and capabilities of Internet mapping, Server-based GIS, and Web GIS. The course includes a computer laboratory portion focusing on customizing ESRI GIS software packages, Google Map and Earth, ESRI ArcIMS, Arc GIS Server, ArcSDE, and MS SQL. Students will use GIS to apply the GIS skills learned through lab exercises to projects that address "real-world" GIS application problems. Relevant applications for different discipline areas are demonstrated in the computer labs.

15GEOG6095C. Quantitative Geography and Spatial Statistics III. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course is the third of a three-sequence series designed to acquaint students with statistical methods and models employed in geographic research. The course will cover advanced and specific techniques in statistics, spatial analysis and geographic models, including application and estimation methods, and further develops students' understanding and application of quantitative processes to solve geographic research problems. Students will continue to develop and perfect their skills with statistical packages and with statistical capabilities in other software.

15GEOG6096C. Advanced Remote Sensing & Image Analysis. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. This course covers a set of advanced topics in remote sensing research. It combines lectures with a substantial practical component developed through hands-on lab work. The lectures cover recently emerged remote sensing systems, including high-resolution multi-spectral imaging systems, topographic and bathymetric LiDAR, and SAR interferometry, and examines cutting-edge remote sensing data processing and analysis techniques, including rigorous orthorectification and DEM generations, atmospheric and water-column corrections, image texture analysis, image segmentation and shape analysis, rule-based and knowledge-based image analysis and understanding, object-oriented image analysis.

15GEOG6098C. Practical Data Mining and Visualization. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Course combines elements of geographical information science (GIS), machine learning, data mining, and information visualization into a set of techniques for exploration of complex spatial data. The course will discuss types of data and tasks encountered in domains ranging from commercial, law enforcement, homeland security, and national security to science including geosciences and life science. Concepts, techniques, and algorithms (classification, clustering, association mining, heat maps, Sammon's maps, self-organizing maps, treemaps and others) will be introduced by means of hands on projects based on real life data.

15GEOG6099C. Exploratory Visual Analytics. 3 ug. or gr. Cr. Course combines elements of geographical information science (GIS), machine learning, data mining, and information visualization into a set of techniques for exploration of complex spatial data. The course will discuss types of data and tasks encountered in domains ranging from commercial, law enforcement, homeland security, and national security to science including geosciences and life science. Concepts, techniques, and algorithms (classification, clustering, association mining, heat maps, Sammon's maps, self-organizing maps, treemaps and others) will be introduced by means of hands on projects based on real life data.

7000-Level Expand

15GEOG7001, 7002, 7003. Geographic Research. 1-12 gr. Cr. Advanced research undertaken on an individual basis and arranged with a faculty supervisor prior to, or at the beginning of the term.

15GEOG7004. Geography Staff Seminar. 1 gr. Cr. Department of Geography faculty will make weekly presentations on their current research. Graduate students have the opportunity to discuss research ideas and methods with the faculty.

15GEOG7005. Professional Development. 1 gr. Cr. Graduate students will work with geography faculty on writing successful research articles, grant proposals, c.v.s, course syllabi and on making effective professional presentations.

15GEOG7009. Seminar: History and Philosophy of Geography. 3 gr. Cr. History and Philosophy of Geography explores the different bodies of thought which have shaped the character of Anglo-American geography and, to some extent, social science, from the Renaissance to the present. This exploration crosses the traditional subdisciplinary divisions of human geography, physical geography and GIScience, examining the ways in which all three have been woven together and pulled apart by broad intellectual trends in the discipline, and by which the similarities and differences among contemporary geographic subfields and social sciences are contingent, historical products.

15GEOG7010. Seminar: Non-Western History and Philosophy of Geography. 3 gr. Cr. Non-Western History and Philosophy of Geography explores how the world, excluding Anglo-America,has approached geography, and, to some extent, social science, through both historical and philosophical contexts. This exploration examines how Eastern, Islamic and other philosophies have informed the discipline of geography, and what similarities and differences from Anglo-American perspectives exist in geographical history, geographic research and in defining geography.

15GEOG7015. Graduate Geography. 3 gr. Cr. The single most important component of a graduate program is independent research. This seminar will examine the design of geographic research. Students will examine and critique the design of research projects as presented in articles and research proposals. Each participant will develop a research proposal on a topic of their choosing with the goal that the proposal will improve and accelerate progress toward completion of her/his graduate degree.

15GEOG7031. Seminar: Human-Environment Relations. 3 gr. Cr. The theme of the seminar is the interconnectedness of people and environment, one of the grand questions in geography. This theme is also referred to as: cultural ecology, human ecology, behavioral geography, and, in earlier times, "man land relations." Readings and discussion will focus on changing theory, methods, and research foci. Specific topics addressed will vary each time the seminar is offered.

15GEOG7032. Seminar in Physical Geography. 3 gr. Cr. In-depth examination of atmospheric, geomorphic and biological processes as they vary over the surface of the earth. The interaction between natural systems and humans is emphasized. Assigned readings from books and research articles define the learning core, and are discussed in a group setting. Specific topics vary each semester.

15GEOG7033. Seminar in Environmental Geography. 3 gr. Cr. In-depth examination global environmental challenges, environmental planning to combat pollution problems, as well as the complexity in environmental data collection and analyses. Emphasis is on modeling and characterizing the environmental conditions, as well as on assessing and predicting the anthropogenic impacts on the environment. Specific topics may vary each semester.

15GEOG7035C. Seminar: Paleoenvironmental Analysis. 3 gr. Cr. This course explores the history and development of earth's climate and ecosystems through an examination of various paleoenvironmental indicators. We will focus on a variety of techniques, learning how researchers identify a geographic region and time period for study, how samples are retrieved, the processing of fossil materials (e.g. soil, ice, wood, pollen) and how these proxy data are used to reconstruct past environments. The course also includes laboratory training in data methods and analysis. Specific data sets and research foci will vary each semester.

15GEOG7036. Seminar in Surficial Processes. 3 gr. Cr. In-depth examination of atmospheric and geologic processes to understand climate and landscapes. Current books and assigned readings discussed in a group setting. Throughout the course, the human impact is emphasized and remedial solutions evaluated.

15GEOG7039. Seminar: Social and Cultural Geography. 3 gr. Cr. The Seminar in Social and Cultural Geography is primarily concerned with society and space, or the ways in which social and cultural relations, identities and inequalities are created, and how they vary spatially. The course will examine a variety of historical and contemporary socially- and culturally-relevant topics through a spatial lens, including social issues affecting people's lives, notions of class, and cultural ideas and practices that have contributed toward the formation of geographical identities of societies.

15GEOG7041. Seminar: Economic Geography. 3 gr. Cr. The Seminar in Economic Geography is an upper-division, advanced graduate seminar covering the historical development of, and traditional research agendas in, the human geography subdiscipline of economic geography. Course emphasis is given to the changing locations and spatial patterns of economic activity, including agriculture, manufacturing, and services, as well as with spatial economic principles of trade, communications, regional economic development and the diffusion of technological innovation.

15GEOG7044. Seminar: Postmodern Economic Geography. 3 gr. Cr. GEOG 7089 is an upper-level, advanced graduate seminar covering recent and current topics in economic geography. The "postmodern" label emphasizes exposure to current areas of research within the subdiscipline, and focuses on changes in research trends and methodologies as affected by the inflections of cultural perspectives, social concerns and globalization of economic phenomena.

15GEOG7047. Seminar: Political Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This course centers on the discussion of key concepts, themes, and debates in political geography. Topics will vary with each seminar offering.

15GEOG7048. Seminar: Critical Geopolitics. 3 gr. Cr. This course centers on discussion of key concepts, themes, theories, and debates in critical geopolitics. Topics will vary with each course offering.

15GEOG7049. Seminar: Electoral Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This course centers on the discussion of key concepts, themes, theories, and debates in electoral geography.

15GEOG7056. Seminar: Historical Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This seminar will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the ideas and practices of historical geography. Students will explore epistemological issues and archival methodologies within this geographic subdiscipline, and will explore a variety of topics whose commonality centers on geographies of the past and how places, regions and phenomena change spatially through time.

15GEOG7057. Seminar: Regional Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This course is an upper-level, advanced graduate seminar covering topics in regional geography, the science of regions and theories of the region. One of the foci of geography has long concerned regional studies, whereby particular or specific areas of the world are examined in a systematic fashion that encompass physical and human geography, and human-land interactions. As such, the purpose of this seminar is to explore those theoretical constructs of regions, and to explore the theories and applications that geographers have long postulated. Seminar topics examine the nature of regions, "regionality," regional studies and regional science through both historical and modern considerations.

15GEOG7058. Gender, Geography, and Science. 3 gr. Cr. We will ask if/how feminist theoretical and political concerns make a critical contribution to science studies. The course will begin with philosophical and methodological critiques and will move onto historical and field specific topics, such as environmental science and ecofeminism. The course has a two-pronged approach: 1) Examining the effects of gender and culture on the investigators of scientific knowledge, 2) Analyzing the biases towards women and men as the subjects of that knowledge. Because this course has a strong spatial component, we will be emphasizing geographic methods of analysis. • Society and science: Insiders and Outsiders, and who's in charge? • Feminist critiques of science • Gender, nature & landscape: 'Ways of seeing'. • The geography of women, men, and work in developed and developing countries • Gender relations & Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK)

15GEOG7060. Seminar: Urban Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This course centers on key concepts, themes, and debates in urban geography. Topics vary with each seminar offering.

15GEOG7061. Seminar: Urban Economic Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This course centers on the discussion of key concepts, themes, theories, and debates in the relationship between the urban environment and various scalar economic influences. Specific topics addressed will vary each time the seminar is offered.

15GEOG7062. Seminar: Urban Sustainability. 3 gr. Cr. The current urban system institutionalized by urban restructuring at the turn of the twenty-first century has significantly contributed to intensification of poverty, inequality, poor levels of community participation, and environmental degradation. This class exams the theoretical underpinnings and policy formation of, and responses to, the issues surrounding sustainable communities.

15GEOG7070. Seminar: Human Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This seminar centers on the critical assessment of both classic and contemporary scholarship in human geography. Readings and discussion will focus on changing concepts, theories, methods, debates, and research foci. Specific topics addressed will vary each time the seminar is offered.

15GEOG7072. Seminar: Population Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This seminar will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the theory, description and analysis of spatial and temporal relationships between factors of population composition, and how the changes in these patterns relate to changes in selected socioeconomic and cultural phenomena. Additionally, the course will explore the causes and consequences of global population growth and change, including migrations, distributions and relationships to natural resources.

15GEOG7073. Seminar: Cultural Geography. 3 gr. Cr. This seminar centers on the critical assessment of both classic and contemporary scholarship in cultural geography. Readings and discussion will focus on changing theory, methods, and research foci. Specific topics addressed will vary each time the seminar is offered.

15GEOG7082. Seminar: natural hazards and disasters. 3 gr. Cr. This course will address recent developments in the study of physical mechanisms and theories of natural hazards, and examine the spatial pattern and trends of different types of natural hazards, new scientific knowledge, planning measures, and new and emerging geo-spatial technologies (remote sensing, GPS, GIS and environmental modeling) will be emphasized for supporting societal preparedness, response, mitigation, recovery, and management of natural hazards.

15GEOG7085. Seminar: Location Theory and Analysis. 3 gr. Cr. This course starts with a review of classic location theories, location of service centers (Christaller's central place theory), including agriculture land use models (the Von Thunen model), and industrial location (Weber's model). More contemporary location models will be then discussed, such as spatial interaction models, trade area analysis, spatial diffusion models, cellular automaton models, network analysis. The conceptual models for covering problems, P-Center problems and P-Median problems will be introduced as well. Linear programming, as a common technique used in location analysis, will also be introduced in this seminar. The focus of this course on how each of the above models works. By completing this course, students are expected to be able to apply the models to their own research.

15GEOG7091. Seminar: GIS. 3 gr. Cr. This course is designed to introduce the latest developments in selected GIS topics, including, but not limited to, simulation, exploratory data analysis, scientific visualization, data mining, clustering analysis, traffic modeling and analysis of traffic stops, dispersion modeling, and retail site selection modeling. Students can also choose their topics for presentation and discussion in class. The topics covered may vary from one year to another.

15GEOG7095C. Seminar: Spatial Statistics. 3 gr. Cr. The Seminar in Spatial Statistics is a reading-intensive course that follows the historical and current literature in the development and applications of spatial statistics in academic research, particularly within geography. The course examines underlying theories of spatial statistics, and then supplements that theoretical understanding with the practical manifestations of spatial statistics in various software programs. In addition, critical perspectives on spatial statistics are also emphasized.

8000-Level Expand

15GEOG8060. Seminar: Urban Research Methods. 3 gr. Cr. This course critically focuses on the deployment and impact of qualitative and quantitative research in urban geographic research. It will provide an introduction to debates around the analysis and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application and practice of these methods.

15GEOG8071. Thesis Research. 1-12 gr. Cr. Research and writing of MA thesis with approval/supervision of advisor.

15GEOG8077. Seminar: Geography and Social Theory. 3 gr. Cr. This seminar centers on the critical assessment of both classic and contemporary scholarship in human geography as it relates to social theory. Readings and discussion will focus on changing concepts, theories, methods, debates, and research foci. Specific topics addressed will vary each time the seminar is offered.

15GEOG8079. Seminar: Human Geography Research Methods. 3 gr. Cr. This course critically focuses on the deployment and impact of qualitative and quantitative research in human geographic research. It will provide an introduction to debates around the analysis and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application and practice of these methods.

15GEOG8081. Seminar: Critical GIS. 3 gr. Cr. The Seminar in Critical GIS explores the foundations and current theoretical, methodological, and empirical elements of research known as "Critical GIS." The course seeks to question the social and political construction of GIS, and the epistemological perspectives that inform it. The intensive reading material examines critiques of GIS and the theories and ontologies informing those critiques, as well as recent ways in which geographers and social scientists are now practicing Critical GIS.

9000-Level Expand

15GEOG9071. Dissertation Research. 1-12 gr. Cr. Research and writing of the PhD dissertation with approval/supervision of advisor.