Faculty

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Susan S Dunford

Title: Associate Professor
Office: 851J-D Rieveschl Hall
Tel: 513-556-9724
Email: dunforss@ucmail.uc.edu

Education

  • PhD, University of Dayton, 1973.

Research Information

Research Interests

Phloem and xylem transport in higher plants and plant water relations


Past research topics include: petiole cooling and its effect on phloem transport rates; the nature of phloem loading in sugar beet (with Donald Geiger, University of Dayton); the measurement of phloem turgor pressure (with Martin Zimmermann, Harvard University); water relations of phloem and xylem in forest trees; and drought tolerance.

Current research is a collaborative project with Dr. Valerie Pence at the Center for Research of Endangered Wildlife, Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. This work concerns abscisic acid (ABA), which is a plant stress hormone, and desiccation tolerance in liverworts.

More information about Dr. Dunford's research is available.

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Dunford, S. 2010. Translocation in the Phloem. In: Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates Inc., Sunderland, MA. pp. 271-303.
  • Book Chapter Dunford, S. 2014. Translocation in the Phloem. In: Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. Plant Physiology, Sixth Edition. Sinauer Associates Inc., Sunderland, MA. This is the foremost textbook in this field.The fifth edition has been translated into 14 languages. I have contributed to all five editions of the text and have been invited to contribute a revision of my chapter to the sixth edition.

Experience & Service

Post Graduate training and Education

  • 1973 to 1976, Post doctoral position, Harvard University, Harvard Forest.

Service

  • Committee Member, Ohio Board of Regents Transfer Assurance Guide (TAG) Biology Panel, 2009 to 2012
  • UC Garden Club Faculty advisor to club, 09-2011 to 06-2012

Courses Taught

  • 15-BIOL-101 BIOLOGY
    15-BIOL-101-002
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 10A
    Comments: I categorized this course as "Old Course Revised" because revision and updating are an integral part of my teaching style. Most recently, this has also included making the lectures as interactive as possible, writing detailed outcomes for each topic, and incorporating PRS questions and quizzes into each lecture. When the PRS questions involve higher-level thinking, the students were encouraged to discuss their reasoning in small groups.
  • 15-BIOL-111-014
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 10A

  • 15-BIOL-111-901
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 10A

  • Plant Physiology
    Plant Physiology
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 10S
    Comments: Six students also used this course as their capstone course. They enrolled in one credit hour of my capstone course (15BIOL686-005). Students selected a topic that had not been covered in the lecture, researched it using the text and primary literature, and reported on their findings in a class presentation and in a short written paper.
  • Plants and People
    Plants and People
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 10W

  • 15-BIOL-102 BIOLOGY
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 10W
    Comments: This course was a new preparation for me, though obviously not a new course in the department. Extensive reading and preparation were required in order to provide a good product for the students.
  • 15-BIOL-101 BIOLOGY
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 10U

  • 15-BIOL-132 PLANTS AND PEOPLE
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 11W

  • 15-BIOL-111 BIOLOGY LAB
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 11W

  • 15-BIOL-113 BIOLOGY LAB
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 11S

  • 15-BIOL-670 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 11S

  • 15-BIOL-111 BIOLOGY LAB
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 11A

  • 15-BIOL-112 BIOLOGY LAB
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 12W

  • 15-BIOL-132 PLANTS AND PEOPLE
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 12W

  • 15-BIOL-670 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 12S
    Comments: Seven students are using this course as their capstone course. They enrolled in one credit hour of my capstone course (15BIOL686-005). Students will select a topic that has not been covered in the lecture, will research it using the text and primary literature, and will report on their findings in a class presentation and in a short written paper.
  • 15-BIOL-603 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 11A

  • 15-BIOL-603 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH
    Level: Undergraduate
    Term: 11A
    Comments: A collaborative research effort with Dr. Valerie Pence (CREW, Cincinnati Zoo) has focused on desiccation tolerance in Riccia fluitans and has involved the work of one undergraduate student researcher. The work continued during 12W and 12S.